Should I speak to the Dr. quietly about this?

I called my Dr office a few days ago to hopefully speak with the Dr. or to make an appointment. His receptionist asked the reason for my appointment. She is NOT a physician, nor a Nurse Practitioner. She said if you have bleeding you should go to hospital. She then asked if I'd had a colonoscopy & what was the results? I felt the crossed the line with her questions, & suggestion. I asked for an appt. to see the Dr., & I was given one...just a few days away.

I don't feel as though the receptionist should be doing this sort of thing. Should I speak quietly to the Dr. about this?

Update:

It wasn't a matter of a "time slot" or how long the appt. would take. When I asked for an appt. she told me she had "a lot are available" which is why I chose a few days away because I love out of town. I've known this receptionist for years now, & have never experienced her questions like this before. What I need to consult the Dr. about I feel, is none of her business!

8 Answers

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  • Edna
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    That's SOP for a receptionist. A receptionist often asks a patient about some of their symptoms and why they want to make an appointment - so they can give the doctor a sort of "heads-up" about you before you go in to see him. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Yes you should speak to the Dr. And next time

    tell the receptionist it's none of her business!!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    This is standard for doctors offices. They need to know the reason and trust me, there is nothing to be embarrassed about. The receptionist has heard it all and worse (and has access to your medical charts)

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  • Tavy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    They do this in the U.K. they are told to ask so they can decide if it is urgent or not.

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  • 1 month ago

    No. and that receptionist may be a medical assistant and trying to determine the best place for you at the time. you are being overly sensitive but what do you care about our opinions as you are arguing with perfectly good answers. You are upset, so be it, but its not out of line. Her business is all the patients.

    • Kookai1 month agoReport

      She is NOT a medical assistant...simply a clerical receptionist. Furthermore, I don't appreciate your comment about me 'arguing'. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    This is a normal practice, and completely legal and demonstrates common sense.  Simply asking the nature of your problem is not an attempt to diagnose your ailment. The doctor wants to be aware of your complaint before you arrive. If the situation sounds serious, you would be directed to seek urgent care as opposed to waiting for a routine appointment. If you don't like talking about your personal problems with a receptionist, have a trusted friend or family member make the call for you.

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  • 1 month ago

    No, they NEED to know why you are seeing the doctor so he or she can have some sort of plan in place for when they see you and you not totally surprised when you come in.  It is common practice and all they are doing is writing it down so the doc has a small idea of what the problem is.

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    • Edna
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Kookai:  If you mentioned that one of your complaints was diarrhea or constipation, asking if you had had a colonoscopy and what were the results was a valid question.

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  • kelvin
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    no you shouldn't as they are just doing their job

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    • Edna
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      She wasn't TRYING to diagnose. She was writing down the general nature of your complaint, so she pass it on to the doctor as a "heads-up" to him before you went in to see him.

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