if the sun balances its relative energy with one planet ,how can it balance all planets simultaneously?

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Change your user name. You've been asking woo-woo questions like this for years.

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    • goring
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      Its very difficult to get a vely vely simple right answer in a complicates subjet

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  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The Sun does not balance it's energy with the planets.

    • goring
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      There is a fulcrum between the sun and the earth where the energy is balanced

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  • 1 month ago

    The influence of any planet on the sun is negligible.  It's each planet that achieves a "balance" of energy, outputting only as much as it receives from the sun (plus a tiny bit extra, if internal fission is going on in the planet).  The sun's energy output would be the same if all of its planets suddenly disappeared.

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  • 1 month ago

    The only thing that the Sun balances is:

    gravity versus radiative pressure

    inwards versus outwards.

    Gravity tries to cause the matter within the Sun to collapse upon itself.

    The fusion at the core releases energy that pushes the matter outwards.

    Period.

    If the two effects were not exactly equal, the Sun would either expand outwards or it would be collapsing. As it is, the Sun is in equilibrium. With or without any planets around it (the process does not care about planets).

    The energy released by the core does eventually make its way through the surface and radiates the Sun's energy in all directions. In total, that is approximately

    383 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 Watts

    Some of it as light, some of it as infrared radiation (heat), some of it as ultraviolet rays (sunburns) and so on.

    A planet will intercept a part of this, depending on the planet's cross section. For Earth, we intercept around 1360 W for each square metre of cross section.

    In order to be balanced in its "energy budget", the Earth must radiate that exact same quantity for all square metres of its surface (as a sphere, the total surface is the sphere is more than the area of its cross-section).  By knowing the amount Earth must radiate (per square metre), we can easily calculate its required temperature.

    It is the planet (not the Sun) that determines what its own balance is.

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  • L
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The sun does not "balance" anything. The fusion reaction that causes our sun to be is not "controlled" by anything. The fusion reaction going on is full, pedal-to-the-metal, go-as-fast-as-it-can, reaction.

    Your question begins with "if the sun balances its relative energy". This is an inaccurate assumption making the entire question invalid.

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  • 1 month ago

    What is "balances its relative energy" supposed to mean? What is "relative energy"?  Lets get even easier: what does "energy" mean to you?

    • neb
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      You will be sorry you asked ....

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Because the Sun has so much mass (even compared to Jupiter) - something like 99/100 of the mass of the solar system is contained in the sun.

    • Zirp
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      there is no "why" in the question

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