Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Computers & InternetHardwareDesktops · 1 month ago

What are the biggest mistakes a first time PC system builder often makes?

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    Buying a cheap CPU. You regret it later, go to upgrade only to find what you need has been superseded & is no longer available. Save, & buy a top line CPU in the first place.

    • PearI L1 month agoReport

      yep thats the advice sanjay from dell gave me! and hes a top level DELL engineer!!!

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  • 1 month ago

    no idea, I did a lot of research before I built my 1st one

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  • 1 month ago

    my biggest mistakes a first time PC system on my hard disk formed. And Erres my all data.

  • Andy T
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Forgot the order and got into awkward position.

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  • Make sure you use standoffs and in the correct position.

    when connecting the front panel peripherals to the motherboard header.

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  • David
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Ideally buy all the parts from the same vendor, that way if there is a problem or incompatibility it’s easier to request a swap, refund or RMA without each vendor blaming the other.

    Making sure all the parts are compatible - Motherboard, CPU, RAM, case 

    Ideally go to partpicker and enter your proposed list, it will advise you of any incompatibilities 

    https://pcpartpicker.com

    With the build, test the bare bones assembled kit on the bench before putting it in the case. Then if there is a problem you don’t have to go ripping everything out again.

    Ideally use an SSD as a boot drive, minimum 250GB and slower 500GB-1TB HDD for storage. If you can afford it go all SSD. 

    Don’t cheap out on a power supply, most builds will be fine with a 600W PSU, just go for a branded quality supply Corsair, enermax, EVGA, Antec, bequiet!. In general you get what you pay for, the heavier the better.

    Make sure you use standoffs and in the correct position. 

    Make sure the grounding straps in the IO shield don’t foul the USB or other ports.

    Pay attention when connecting the front panel peripherals to the motherboard header.

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  • 1 month ago

    The biggest mistake some rookie builders make is not reading the documentation that came with the motherboard and case. Then they'll come to a forum like this and ask which port they should use for their NVMe drive. The guy in the infamous Verge video on Youtube could have saved himself from a lot of embarrassment by reading the instructions and asking questions.

    Another mistake I see people make, not just rookies, is with the power supply. I'll see people recommend an 850w Power Supply for a simple gaming build that uses a GPU like the GTX 1070, RTX 2060, or even a GTX 1660ti. Either that or the builder will cut costs by purchasing a power supply that's not known to be reliable. Upsizing the PSU is actually detrimental if your system is NOT drawing at least 25-30% of the PSU's capacity, because the power supply has an efficiency curve.

    Aside from fumbling around with ports and connectors. Other mistakes are not prepping the motherboard, case, and not having everything organized.

    Also, I often see builds on craigslist or offerup where the GPU or the RAM is not in the best slot. There's a guy in my local area who's been trying to sell a Gaming PC with a Core i7-7700k for a almost a year. The AIO cooler is mounted with the Corsair label rotated 90 degrees, the Graphics card is in 2nd x8 slot, and the cables are a mess.

    On mistake I see occasionally is there will be a builder who insists on spending an extra $100+ CPU like the Core i7-8086k or Core i9-9900ks which end up cutting into their Graphics card budget or budget for other parts. There's nothing wrong with those processors if you plan to overclock them and spend a decent chunk of change on the cooler, but these people paired the processors up with weak motherboards and weak coolers.

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  • 1 month ago

    not wearing a grounding wrist strap and not properly connecting it to ground. After that, if you follow directions, it's pretty much straightforward

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  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Buying the wrong Parts.   Parts that are not compatible.

    The First thing you should consider is which CPU you want.  AMD or Intel.

    Then decide which Model CPU you want, then you get a Motherboard with the features you want that is compatible with that CPU.  AMD and Intel CPU/s are not interchangeable.  They have different Sockets.

    Next is to consider you Graphics Processor.  Do you want just basic graphics or are you building a gaming PC?   Basic Graphics can come onboard the Motherboard with out the need to purchase a separate GPU.  That needs to be considered when looking at your Motherboard.

    Next is RAM that is compatible with the Motherboard.

    Nest is the Hard Drive - Get a Solid State Hard Drive.   M.2 type SSD (250GB) is the best option for the Operating System then a 1TB SSD for Storage.  Make sure your Motherboard has a M.2 slot.

    Then Case and Power supply. 

    The CPU should  come with a Fan and Heat Sink and Thermal Grease,  otherwise you will have to purchase a Heat Sink and Fan and Thermal Grease for the CPU.

    Operating System:  Windows 10 Pro  or LINUX.

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  • 1 month ago

    Wrongly applying cooling paste. Buying a slow shitty mechanical drive instead of SSD for operating system.

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