J B asked in Science & MathematicsWeather · 1 month ago

Why is the north pole cold? Heat rises so it should be the hottest place on eath?

6 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    don't feed the trolls

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • oikoσ
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It is a sad comment on the status of modern education that I can't be sure that you are asking tongue-in-cheek.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    The earth rotates in a circle 365 days year round.

    In the summer months the NH is closest to the Sun, which means thats where the warmest weather is, and also given the SH is furthest away from the sun, that's where the coldest weather lies.

    The north and south poles never really face the sun, which means, the heat never really shines down on it.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    For part of the year the North Pole is in total darkness. There is only a limited time that it receives full sunlight but that light is at a very steep angle so it transmits less heat to the surface. 

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 1 month ago

    It will be when all the ice melts. Ice floats to the top too.

    • Christopher Cady
      Lv 4
      1 month agoReport

      If it all melts before the next pole reversal. The ice, of course, formed when the North Pole /used/ to be the South Pole. Magnetic Reversal of the Poles causes them to switch periodically. Ice melts when it's the North Pole, but water freezes when it's the South Pole.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 1 month ago

    No. The thermal gradient across the pole is similar to the gradient at the surface of a bell jar and it does not move. We all know that if the top is hot and the bottom is cold then the top is hotter than the bottom.

    After a while you may be able to feel the top hot and the bottom cold by putting a mark on the surface where you have felt the temperature. But, just as the temperature of the bell jar rises and falls with the position of the mark, it rises and falls with the position of the northern hemisphere.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.