Can I reuse timing belt ? ?

I have a 3.5 charger timing belt snapped bought new water pump tensioner and timing belt threw it on and ran car. Car starts but shakes violently decided I’m just going to get new engine. Now that I’ve experienced a snapped belt out of nowhere I want to throw on a new belt/pump on the replacement engine would it be fine to take these components of the old engine and put em on the replacement they’ve been on the car for about a week but everything is basically still brand new 

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  • 2 months ago

    Why waste money on a new belt, just use the snapped belt and melt the ends together with a lighter until it bonds itself back together. Then, spit on it while it's still hot and fit back to the vehicle. 

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  • M.
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Probably.

    You can probably reuse the engine too.

    Check the cylinder compression and tell us what you found.

    I don't remember if that engine is an interference design, but you likely have some bent valves.

    p.s.  from: Chrysler SOHC V6 engine - Wikipedia

    1993–97 3.5 L engines are a non-interference engine meaning that the valves will not collide with the pistons in the event of a timing belt failure.

    The 1998–2001 3.2 L, the 1998–2010 3.5 L, and the 2007–2011 4.0 L engines are interference designs.

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  • CB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Given the work you just completed (and likely in error) this makes a LOT of sense; "Car starts but shakes violently decided I’m just going to get new engine"

    NOT!

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yeah-NO. Not worth the time of any mechanic.

     But,but,but it is perhaps(in most times it is) faster, cheaper and easier to TIME IT.  When car shakes violently, you MESSED UP somewhere because the car does not come out of the factory Shaky. Right? So you Fujked it up. Admit it.Admitting that to yourself speeds up the process.. in my day all there was, was the Public Library and books...on car repair. So in quick time I learned which repair manuals were better than others by using them, first reading in the library and getting an OVERVIEW of what I had and which book had clear instructions.  Got TOOLED UP & ready to rock.  The car I had was a '55 Chev Belair abandoned. with a missing distributor on a V8 motor.  I learned about firing order and where the pistons were located.   GM counts differently than Ford or Chrysler as to which piston is which.  1 & 8 is in the identical position but 6 pistons are different.I do not know how far you went back.  I also do not know if you know if your engine is an INTERFERENCE ENGINE or not.  If it is, you bent a valve or 2 or 3, so no compression from those cylinders would be like taking those spark plug wires off the spark plugs and leave them hanging.  Those cylinders are dead just the same.If it NOT an interference engine, then the valve bending did not happen....so there is compression in all cylinders.    If you yanked the wires and then were confused as to which wire went where - YOU CAN'T BE WRONG -- or the engine does not run right.  Shake shimmy and roll and pop fizz and backfire out the intake or out the tailpipe.  Unfortunately I could not tell on the Chrysler write up on the car.  They only talk about look, ride, feel.  Nothing technical.Just that the engine was made in Germany.    My car was also German...so the timing belt Interference engine came to mind.A 6 will run on 2 cylinders and shake like "sht". No power. So something is wrong.  Because you said timing belt, I had a car with a timing belt and changed it before it snapped TO SAVE THE MOTOR FROM SELF DESTRUCTION as it was an Interference Engine.  Putting in a new belt is not the finish.  You HAVE TO MAKE SURE IT IS RIGHT OR you are bending valves...as soon as you turn it over.    Then you have to give it to a shop so they can fine tune the injection timing to within a "Cnt"-HAIR of being DEAD ON.    That is how fussy it is.  Not something you do by ear.As you have run the engine chances are good that you bent some valves.  Meaning a head job or both heads.  Still cheaper than a new crate motor.   A new engine comes with a belt already installed so having one wrapped up in plastic sitting in a dark closet for 5 years seems like a waste of time.   It will take that long before the next belt needs to be replaced.(or 60,000 miles-whichever comes first)They are not going to sell you a crate motor without it having the timing belt.  Nor will you get a refund back for the belt you got now.  That money is GONE.

    Maybe start by pulling all the spark plugs and taking a compression test on each cylinder.  If you got cylinders that read 0 then they got bent valves.   It won't run right until that is fixed first.  Then time the cam to the crankshaft correctly and also the distributor timing is correct and the firing order is right.

    Compression-check, ignition timing-check- fuel injection timing-check...then it should run.

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  • 2 months ago

    Go ahead. If you do the job right, no problem. Perhaps you should diagnose the engine you have and correct the mistake you made.

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  • Dan
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    You can do that if it's the same engine but it would be a lot less work to do a compression test, find out which valves are bent and pull the heads to replace the bad valves. You might only have to yank one head.

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  • JetDoc
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I'm betting that the reason your old engine is "shaking violently" is because the ignition timing is out of synch. You installed the belt wrong! There is no reason to replace the engine. Just fit your timing belt properly.

    • Dan
      Lv 4
      2 months agoReport

      It's an interference engine that snapped a belt, chances are very slim valves didn't get bent.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Check each part and make sure they are identical to the thousands of an inch.  There should not be any problem if they are.

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  • 2 months ago

    I'd have no problem with doing that as long as there were no differences in mid production changes.

    The timing belts should have the exact same number of teeth and makes sure that the water pump impeller is the same and not made to pump the other direction.

    Replace any idler and tensioner bearing for the T-belt.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
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