Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthMental Health · 8 months ago

Is repressing memories a good coping mechanism for trauma?

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  • 8 months ago
    Favourite answer

    "Repressed memories are memories that have been blocked from conscious perception as a result of significant stress or trauma. When we experience a significant degree of stress or trauma, our sympathetic nervous system becomes hyperactivated and overwhelms our brain. The brain is overwhelmed with surges of intense emotions and stimulation via the sympathetic nervous system" (mentalhealthdaily.com).   

    If someone who believes they may have repressed memories is ready to take the steps necessary to heal from past trauma I would research local mental health resources and seek a qualified counselor/therapist to discuss options. Some of the common strategies used by qualified professionals are as follows:

    EMDR: Eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing is a technique employed to cope with trauma and can be used to uncover repressed memories. When a traumatic event is experienced, it overwhelms neural coping mechanisms. EMDR is an 8-phase treatment that helps a person reprocess a traumatic event and cope with their repressed memories.Internal Family Systems Therapy: This is a specific type of psychotherapy that targets traumatic experiences that occur in individual, couple, and family scenarios. The practice combines various elements of the “mind” with “systems thinking.” Those trained in IFST help others heal on their own without a sense of urgency or persuasion.Neurofeedback: Addressing faulty electrical activity (i.e. brain waves) within the cortex can be an effective way to cope with repressed memories. Neurofeedback involves analyzing areas of the brain in which certain brain waves are abnormal, and self-correcting them via a feedback loop. By correcting abnormal brain waves, an individual may recover repressed memories.Sensorimotor psychotherapy: This is a body-centered form of psychotherapy that can be effective in uncovering repressed memories and coping with any associated trauma. It involves increasing awareness of bodily sensations to help buried memories and emotions resurface.Somatic experiencing: This is a form of therapy that focuses on reliving symptoms of PTSD by focusing on somatic experiences and [perceived] bodily sensations. It is based on the idea that trauma and repressed memories stem from autonomic nervous system dysfunction. This therapy allows individuals to work towards correcting this dysfunction and “healing.”significant degree of stress or trauma, our sympathetic nervous system becomes hyperactivated and overwhelms our brain. The brain is overwhelmed with surges of intense emotions and stimulation via the sympathetic nervous system "(mentalhealthdaily.com). 

  • Alfred
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    well, it's a good and hard question.

     at least in the short run  it might  be a good coping mechanism.

     in the longer run- probably every person is different.

     additional questions are to be asked in real life.

     by all means, when/ before  coping mechanisms fail- professional mental health / psychological support may be mandatory and clearly needed - until/ unless proven otherwise

  • 8 months ago

    Anything that works is a good coping mechanism for trauma. Learning how to paint or draw or write or play a musical instrument, meditating and yoga, hiking and backpacking,  camping out, petting a dog or cat,  getting a lot of exercise, traveling,  refusing to be around traumatizing people including the worst  kind of psychiatrists and mental health professionals who want to emphasize the negative, slap dehumanizing  labels on you all the time and make you feel like you’d be better off dead or drugged to the gills. And yes , they have a pill for that.All things that are positive and life enhancing are good mechanisms to cope with trauma

  • 8 months ago

    Usually is.  Your brain if your trauma is too much to handle, you might forget it, for a while, while your sub brain is dealing with it.  And when the sub brain thinks you can handle it, then you find out about it. 

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  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    Not really. Doing such will cause that person more harm in the long run. Such will be a weight that's just going to drag that person done more then experiencing any positivity.

  • 8 months ago

    In my humble opinion,if you are able to forget things and go on with your life,focusing on better and happier things,why should you go back to those unhappy thoughts? BUT if they're affecting you in your everyday mental health,and you';re unable to function normally,you should get professionally treated ONLY.Good luck and God bless.

  • 8 months ago

    ...................................no

  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    I mean some would say its not healthy but if it works, it works. Ive suppressed so many things and it seems as the years go by, I start to forget them piece by piece.

  • Aa
    Lv 5
    8 months ago

    The problem with trying to remember "repressed" memories is you may end up with false memories. Read about false memory in www.wikipedia.org. False memories can cause a lot of problems. If you forgot something, keep it forgotten. If you remember something bad and you cannot forget it after many years (no matter how much you try by distracting yourself with other activities) then you may need to speak with a psychologist or counselor

    Source(s): .
  • Anonymous
    8 months ago

    h..................

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