How competitive is it to be a psychotherapist in NYC?

I have thought about heading to NYC after getting my 3000 hours of supervised experience. I know NYC is expensive and competitive for many jobs. I hear NYC is a great place to start a career. I hear the average therapy session in NYC can cost between $200-$250 an hour. I looked at Psychology today and found that many charge around that price. Anyway I thought I could get into the more affordable therapy market and charge between $100-150 sliding scale. I am interested in more empirically supported therapies such as CBT and ACT.

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  • MS
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you try to start out with your own private practice, then you will likely struggle considerably.  It will be hard for you to afford the rent on an office space there, on top of your ability to afford to live there. There are also plenty of psychotherapists in NYC (also plenty of need for them there), so you aren't likely going to stand out enough at first to easily build a clientele. And you won't have connections with anyone there to get referrals.  If you can join an established practice or work in a hospital or clinic at first, then you might be able to establish yourself enough to go out on your own eventually.  

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  • 1 month ago

    Better make sure you’re on top of your game and highly sought after or you won’t be able to pay your commercial office rent and other living expenses . Also not sure about garden-variety CBT or trauma-based therapies. New Yorkers tend to be pretty tough so many do not seek trauma-based therapy. And CBT is a little bit too jejeune, I imagine. . You’re going to be dealing with fairly sophisticated, worldly-wise people.You’d do better with a psychoanalytically- oriented approach probably. Go back to school. Or start a practice in the ‘burbs

    • I should clarify that ACT is acceptance and commitment therapy a unique therapy. It does sound like psychoanalytic is popular in NYC. I thought I could market my self as a person who's therapy is  empirically supported and does not beat around the bush like psychanalysis

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