Why do scientists say that physics breaks down inside the event horizon of a black hole, but they say that black holes have mass?

If physics breaks down, then doesn’t the definition of mass also break down?

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  • D g
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Physics is a set of rules nature appears to follow .. the rules inside a black holes event horizon would be something we currently can't understand 

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  • Tom S
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Our current understanding of physics may breakdown, but physics does not define mass, rather how mass acts and reacts under different conditions.  The conditions inside the event horizon, are too extreme to fit current models.

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  • 1 month ago

    Physics doesn't break down. Our best physics theory of gravity, general relativity, breaks down at the singularity. We don't know what happens there, but we know the concept of mass/energy still exists because we can observe the gravity of a black hole from outside.

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  • 1 month ago

    Physics breakdown as in there is infinite density. You have all this mass in a single point. How can that be possible?

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  • 1 month ago

    It is clear that Black Holes have Mass because of their Gravity, and the absolute abundance of it

    The Highest Mass is concentrated right down in the Singularity

    This Singularity would have the Mass of multiple stars,

    Possibly Billions

    Even though to all intents and purposes, in Physics and Mathematics it is an Impossibility

    The Event Horizon is the name given to the point at which Light can not escape the pull of Gravity

    Talk about a Breakdown

    Black Holes simply defy Reality

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    Source(s): I think that kinda explains it
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  • 1 month ago

    But, the mass of a black hole can be measured - by how objects close to it behave.  There are a number of stars orbiting the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way - and, by their orbital speed and the shape of their orbits, we can determine how much mass the black hole has. 

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  • 1 month ago

    "Our  physics" -- "our theories about the universe" -- often break down ,particularly as they approach  limits such as zero and infinity. And by that , it invariably means that the math "describing" it breaks down 

    That's when we have to look for "better" theories -- and are often forced to re-examine what we mean ,and understand ,by our concepts of mass and energy etc. 

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  • 1 month ago

    the physics doesn't break down, only atomic matter that crosses event horizon.

    Inside this radius is a super dense matter where gravity is so strong nothing can escape.

    Not that atomic matter just becomes that much more black hole.

    Can't have gravity without mass causing it.

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Physics doesn't break down and nobody says it does. You just get rather more extreme physics.

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  • neb
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    So, ignoring unresolved conflicts between quantum mechanics and general relativity, physics doesn’t ‘break down’ until we reach the singularity - if a singularity exists.

    Einstein’s field equations - and their solution - are continuous across the event horizon and only break down at the singularity - if it exists. So, ignoring all of the intense activity around a real black hole, a human can survive the trip across the event horizon of a super massive black hole - the tidal forces are quite small. So for a great deal of the interior, physics is completely normal.

    However, general relativity is a spacetime theory. It doesn’t explicitly tell us (other than tidal forces) what happens to matter as you approach the singularity. In this region, it is likely that a quantum gravity theory will be needed although it should be noted that there are reasonable modifications to general relativity (e.g., Einstein-Cartan) which may prevent singularities from forming.

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    • neb
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      No, it was directed at ‘first name’. Trying to emphasize that it’s not just mass. People have a hard time making a clean break with a Newton.

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