Is an omnivore diet the best of both worlds or is a vegan diet still the preferred diet?

Just watched a documentary saying how a vegetarian diet is superior in every way to eating animal based products. However I read a study not long after disregarding the validity and reliability of the documentary. Am now wondering if the vegan diet really is the superior one or is the omnivore diet the best of both worlds

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  • 1 month ago

    "Is an omnivore diet the best of both worlds or is a vegan diet still the preferred diet?"

    Although there are claimants for a wide variety of dietary preferences. Whether it's a full on omnivorous diet, some form of the lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, or even a a strict vegetarian diet, which is what those who are full on true vegans follows. However the reality is that there is no one fits all diet. Genetics medical issues, and food allergies, and/or food sensitivities, plus if there are any religious/spiritual beliefs all has to be factored in. However perhaps one of, if not potentially the healthiest, is what's known as the pescatarian diet. Conversely perhaps the least healthiest, and also most dangerous is what some call the all raw paleo fruititarian diet.

    Take as an example someone born with type two diabetes, they have to watch and limit their intake of carbohydrates. The strict vegetarian diet (A.K.A. vegan diet) will NOT be a friendly diet for either diabetics, and hypoglycemics to follow in general. This is due to it being generally a carbohydrate heavy diet.This can also later be complicated, due to other health issues that can arise, such as Krohn's disease which if progressed far enough, to require a colostomy being performed, where the large intestine is removed. Then there, they're going to have to watch their intake of highly fibrous plant based foods. Especially things such as leafy green vegetables, and legumes. The reason is that the digestive tract is NOT capable of the dense fiber found in those foods, which can block the hole made for the colostomy bag that they'll have, for the rest of their life.However on the opposite end would be those who are allergic to eggs poultry/fowl, and fish/shellfish/seafood, that somehow would have contracted what's known as the alpha gal syndrome, via a bite from a pest or insect such as the lone star tick. The effects of contracting alpha gal, can range from mild to even potentially causing death. There has been at least one confirmed death to my knowledge currently. For some even just being in the proximity of meat, or animal based foods being cooked, is enough for those with more severe case, to have a reaction. The upside with alpha gal is it can range from on the low end, of about six months to as far out as about eight years. However re-contracting it, can make it worse, or if not increase the time of recovery from it, and if exposed enough, a life time health  issue.These are just two examples of why I've come to believe that there is NO SUCH thing as a one diet fits all diet. However there are those in all of the various dietary followings, who ascribe to the concept of the whole one diet fits all diets. They  have  either convinced themselves that as it works for them, and thereby will work for everyone else,and there by are very naive, or are gullible enough to believe everything they've read, heard, and/or seen in some video.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Well first you have to clarify whether you are referring to the vegan or vegetarian since they are both different, the vegetarian allows the consumption of animal products that are not the result of the death of an animal (honey, eggs and dairy) which the vegan diet avoids all animal products and foods made from them.

    A balanced diet no matter what type of diet you are on is always the best option however there are certain things to consider.  If you are looking for a "natural" diet then either the vegetarian or fully omnivorous diets are the best option.  In order to be healthy the vegan diet must be properly supplemented (the issue with many of the reports I have is that they assume, for the most part, that everyone on the diet takes the appropriate supplements) while, for the most part, the vegetarian diet (not including the strict vegetarian diet which is basically the same as vegan) and fully omnivorous diets do not require any supplements if properly balanced (they are both a "live off the land" type of diet).

    In it's ability to feed the Earth's population the vegan diet lags in 5th place overall with two forms of the vegetarian diet (including eggs and/or dairy) hold the greatest ability to feed the world followed by two balanced forms of the fully omnivorous diet with up toe 40% animal products.

    My personal feeling is that the fully omnivorous well balanced diet is superior since it avoids (depending of course on personal health issues) the necessity of supplementing your diet and life expectancy overall is certainly equivalent.

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  • 1 month ago

    A vegetarian diet is not superior at all. And you watched common propaganda, not a real documentary 

    All humans are omnivores and we need meat to be healthy 

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  • 1 month ago

    Lots of people choose the carnivore diet too. Considering we are omnivores, i think it's healthy to eat both meats and vegetables. It's been the basic human diet for thousands of years.

    Those who were hunters and gatherers in centuries gone by are believed to have eaten more vegetation than meats. But they still ate meat when they could get it. And then there were people who lived in climates without vegetation at all - far north Alaska for example. They ate meat/whale/fish all year long, and got little or no vegetables in their diet at all.

    In today's world, it seems like everyone is in a competition to get diabetes, with all the processed and sugar-laden foods they eat. For me, i do my shopping in the produce and meat departments and i eat healthy fats, not unnatural fats. And no processed foods.

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  • Louis
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    First off keep in mind that veganism is more than a diet. It's a lifestyle. And its main objective isn't personal health, it's compassion. 

    I don't think the vegetarian diet is the best choice. Eggs and Milk are not healthy. A strict vegetarian diet could be good. 

    For health concerns, a Whole Foods Plants-Based diet is probably the healthiest. And according to some of the authors a WFPB diet can include some animal products but the reduction of processed foods, oils, and sugar makes it a really healthy diet. 

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  • 1 month ago

    humans are omnivores as are many other creatures like most birds, fishes, bears, etc.

    Being vegan is choice.

    An omnivore diet is ideal for omnivores.

    Not so very long ago, a vegan diet wouldn't have been possible because there were no supplemented foods, alternative milks and b12 supplements.

    A vegan diet is a killer if supplemented foods and or good multivitamin weren't available because there are a few key nutrients we need that are only in animal products. B 12 being one of them.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    As your question implies, it depends on who you ask.

    I’d say that an ordinary omnivorous diet, a vegetarian diet and a vegan diet can all be perfectly healthy (what's in them is more important than what's missing). Also diet normally has only limited effect on a person's health - lifestyle is far more important: someone who takes no exercise, smokes forty cigarettes a day and drinks heavily is wasting their time worrying about their diet.

    We've known for years, maybe decades, that eating a lot of processed meat (like bacon) or a lot of overdone meat results in an increased incidence of certain cancers. More recently evidence seems to suggest that a lot of red meat is also unhealthy. But most people don't eat “a lot” of these things.

    There is no doubt that some of the “new age” vegans present a very biased view and that much of what they claim is simply rubbish. To me, this has confused and clouded the issue and has worked against, rather in favour of, veganism.

    I would be interested in hearing, if meat and animal products are intrinsically bad for us (even just half as bad as some of these people say) why are we still here as a species? Why are all the people following omnivorous diets not obviously sick and unhealthy? There have been vegans since at least the 1940s. That's not nearly long enough for the non-vegans to have become extinct but surely it's been long enough for “super-healthy” vegan communities and societies to have developed? Why is it unhealthy for omnivores to consume an omnivorous diet, and what of other omnivores - are they following an unhealthy diet too?

    Personally I'd just wait until the dust settles and the medical profession decides. If my doctor told me animal products were bad for me I'd listen. When there was enough evidence that smoking was bad for the health we were told again and again to stop smoking. We've been told to reduce our consumption of alcohol and to take fewer antibiotics. If meat and other animal products were really considered unhealthy we'd be told.

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  • polly
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It really depends on your own dietary needs for what suits you.

    Vegans can fund,direct,produce & make movies that appear to show that their diet & lifestyle far supersedes all other diets,but omnivore's that include milk,dairy,eggs etc in their diet can make equally valid & convincing arguments by way of  documentary movies showing that their lifestyle & way of eating is superior.It really depends which dietary camp you're in & knowing what the film makers motives are when it comes to food diet documentaries.

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  • 1 month ago

    As far as nutrition, omnivore is the "best" diet. If you are concerned about the impact of your diet on the planet or have a concern for the treatment of animals then it gets a lot more complicated as both sides like to exaggerate the "truth". In the end, its going to come down to your own personal choices.

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