if you're playing music in a room and you open a window does the room get quieter because the sound escapes out the window?

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  • Lv 7
    2 months ago

    sound waves don't change direction unless you reorient their source. it's not like water that flows to the path of least resistance, or heat which expands to fill a container.

    think of it like throwing a bunch of bouncy balls. opening a window won't make the balls get thrown to the window. eventually they will bounce around and some may leave thru the window, but by then they will have lost power, and only the last bitvof bounce will go out. opening a window won't keep them from bouncing on the walls. just from bouncing on that particular area where the window is.

    so sound, unless the source is moved up to the window, won't just go straight out. you'll still hear it, and only a small bit will escape, butvit won't make a noticable change to volume.

    good question!

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  • 2 months ago

    I don't know about quieter, especially from your perspective as the listener. The tone may change depending on your position in the room and this could give the illusion of less volume because there is one less surface for the sound to bounce off of. The full energy (loudness) comes directly from the speakers, where this energy is then absorbed or bounced off of surfaces that diminishes this energy (lowers the volume), which is why if the speakers are only at the stage it gets quieter the further from the stage you are. If you are standing right in front of the speakers, you will notice no difference in tone or volume from opening a window. It is only when you change your position in the room that you will notice a potential sound change.

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  • 2 months ago

    The acoustic environment changes, but not level pressures.

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  • 2 months ago

    Right now, a large concert hall in NYC is being refurbished. When audio engineers test the hall, empty, they must calculate for the sound absorbtion if the bodies filling the seats.  I have heard of the factor of absorbtion referred to as Open Window Units.  I will see if I can verify this.

    Found this:

    https://www.troldtekt.com/Product-properties/Good-...

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  • 2 months ago

    Im inside ur window im the creepy man :D

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes because the sound has a way to escape and does not bounce back

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  • 2 months ago

    No, I don't play music that loud.

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  • 2 months ago

    It stays the same. The sound that escapes is replaced by the sound of your next door neighbor yelling to turn the music down.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes.

    The walls - and windows and doors - will tend to "hold" and reflect the sound back into the room.

    Opening a window or door will allow some of that sound to exit the room

    rather than being reflected/rebounded back into the room.

    • Quartney2 months agoReport

      wowie thank you

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