Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenMaintenance & Repairs · 1 year ago

How do we measure horsepower?

Horses would all be of different strengths presumably..

8 Answers

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  • David
    Lv 5
    1 year ago

    Job 1 was to determine how much work the average horse could do in an 8 hour day.  Without a standard definition, it would be meaningless.  And of course, many governments came up with their own bad definitions.  The infamous Peugeot 2 CV (deux chevaux) was so named because it made two tax horsepower even though it really made a whopping 9 hp when it was introduced.

    You can't measure horsepower directly.  You have to measure torque and speed and then calculate HP.

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

     How  do "I " ( you "  measure Horse power  I measure it  by How wild my hair is blown  with the car windows open while the car is moving

  • Anonymous
    1 year ago

    Here, I looked it up for you since you are really not so smart.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsepower

  • GTB
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    By definition 1 horsepower = 550 ft-lbs/sec = 746 watt; actually horses have nothing to do with "horsepower" in the strict sense; to measure 1 horse power you lift 550 lbs up 1 foot in 1 second or 275 lb 2 ft in 1 sec or 110 lb 5 ft in 1 sec

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  • 1 year ago

    there's an international standard for that -- google will find it

  • elhigh
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    James Watt observed what mine ponies could do during a shift and then, for good measure, rounded up to an even number and called it a horsepower.  33,000 ft-lbs per minute.

    They are of different strengths.  Mine ponies, carriage horses, Ol' Dobbin behind the plow - they all have different capacities of output that they can sustain.It's pretty arbitrary.  Other engineers had proposed foot-pound-time measurements that were not in agreement with this number but unlike those other guys, Watt was also building engines and had better market recognition.  Given something to sell and by which to use such a measurement, Watt's horsepower gained much broader recognition and here we are, 250 years later, still using it.

    For reference, the scientific community doesn't use it at all.

  • 1 year ago

    That is how it was done. James Watt, the guy who invented the steam engine, need a selling point for his engine, so he figured out the strength of a horse for an extended amount of time and calibrated his engine to that. It was a horse pulling on a lifted load of X pounds for an extend time. The number was way off, but it worked.

  • Snezzy
    Lv 7
    1 year ago

    You might look at the wikipedia article:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsepower

    The purpose was to compare James Watt's new steam engine against something that was well understood, the strength of a usual draught horse.

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