Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 2 months ago

What happens when you accidentally tell a jewish person that non-kosher food is kosher?

I work at a self-serve ice cream shop and feel disgusting for the mistake I made today. A Jewish family came in asking if everything was kosher, and I responded saying yes. I second guessed myself after telling them and it turns out that some of our toppings are non-kosher. I didn’t know what to do and felt so ashamed that I kept quiet. My ignorance has cost them now, and I can’t stop thinking about what I did. What will happen to them according to their beliefs? And could I get fired for this? Thank you all for the help :(

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    You cannot get fired for making a mistake. First of all, you have no idea what makes something kosher or not kosher. Even if you think something is kosher, chances are you will be wrong anyway. Then there are levels of religiosity with the Jewish faith. Some Jews require higher hashgacha supervision than others. Many Jews do not eat Ice-cream which isn't Chalav Yisrael. Others don't eat ice-cream even if it is chalav yisrael but was also made on non-chalav yisrael dairy equipement. That is, the icecream is made using Jewish milk i.e. it was supervised that the milk wasn't replaced or swapped or tampered with a substitute or non kosher ingredients and the equipment was not also used for chalav stam or regular milk by non-Jews. 

    I hold the very strictest standards of kashrut among Orthodox Jews in most situations except on cultural differences. Chabad may have different standards to Sephardim. In most situations Sephardim are lenient but also have higher standards optionally. For example Glatt Yisrael meat. Many Chabadniks also only eat Glatt Kosher by choice although accept non glatt kosher meat. On the other hand, Chabad in Israel even in the meat industry holds the strictest kosher symbol for meat, higher than even the Sephardim. If you visit Israel this is the blue hechsher or kosher symbol. While in most places Sephardim have the yellow hechsher which is more lenient. 

    Another cultural difference is Ashkenazim only require a Jew to be present when a non-Jew does work for him. But Sephardim i.e. the Bet Yosef require the Jew to be actively involved in the cooking as well e.g. the Jew lights the fire or turns to bread over or increases the temperature etc. 

    Next time tell the family if they ask what symbol it is. If they don't recognize it find out at least if it is orthodox, conservative or reform. Let them know. They can google search or phone/text message the rabbi if the kosher symbol is acceptable in the movement/branch of Judaism they belong too. 

    You do not have any authority to tell them if something is kosher or not. If you are professionally catering for Jews i.e. a mashgiach is involved then you can get into a lot of trouble. Usually there is a telephone number you can also ring their company if you have doubts or inquiries.

    That stated you should inform them that they cannot rely on you to check if it is kosher or not. Tell them that a rabbi or mashgiach spelled mash-gi-ak has to confirm if it is. All you can do is show them the list of products in your ice cream shop or show them the symbol on the box in the back of the refrigerator. If its kosher for the most religious Orthodox Jew he or she will not accept the icecream in a tub or tray, he will only buy it if the ice-cream is still in the box or watches you scoop it out of the box and onto a kosher cone.

    Source(s): Orthodox Jew
  • BMCR
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I suspect this is a troll question.

    Why would a Jewish family that keeps kosher rely on your say so merely because you work there?

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    • BMCR
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      "who don't know very little about kosher "
      That should be "who know very little about kosher".

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  • 2 months ago

    "kosher" is not biblical. It is part of the man-made laws many of the Jews follow. Jewish people do not necessarily have to eat "kosher" so don't feel bad about it - no harm no foul. The Takkanah is full of their man-made laws, most of which thy are unable to remember much less keep.

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    • BMCR
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Moreover, if he really meant Tanakh, then that is Biblical, by definition which contradicts his statement that kosher laws are not biblical.

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  • 2 months ago

    It would be like telling someone to eat germ filled garbage. It could harm them (spiritually), but accidents happen.

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  • 2 months ago

    People make mistakes. I have been vegetarian for forty years and very occasionally I have eaten a bit of meat by mistake. Nothing "happened". Forget it and be careful next time.

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  • 2 months ago

    It is gonna happen:absolutely nothing.Unlike diabetes or food allergies, gods do not exist.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Well, I’m no expert but as long as you gave a good faith answer it’s ok. As long as a Jew believes they are eating kosher they are basically ok. 

    (Side story: my brother in law was away at a scientific conference. They got out very late and invited 2 Hasidic Jewish scientists  to come back to their rented house for dinner since all the restaurants in town were closed. One Hasidic asked if everything was kosher, the second one interrupted and said “Do you want to eat tonight? Then don’t ask, just believe it is then we can eat.”)

  • 2 months ago

    If they were very worried, they would have confirmed it, and not just taken your word for it.  Is kosher posted anywhere in your shop?  If not, then don't worry about it.  But don't tell anyone else that your stuff is kosher....just say you don't know, and then let it be your supervisor's responsibility to find out.

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  • They won't believe you, they would have to confirm it. They will only buy food confirmed as kosher or eat in a restaurant they know serves kosher food.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    You should've told them that nothing there was kosher and politely asked them to leave and never return.  

  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Nothing happens at all. 

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