Did Randy Rhoads and Eddie Van Halen indirectly compete with each other?

2 of the best players at the time and maybe ever in California. Randy has his band with  Quiet Riot then Van Halen explodes with Eruption, and his insane guitar playing. Randy had decent albums with QR but could not get a good record deal in America only in Japan. His guitar playing was still fine I hear some riffs in some of his songs in QR would be future Ozzy songs.

then he is with Ozzy and just like VH shocking us in 1978 he did in 1980. 

VH wrote Eruption? No problem I got Mr Crowley.

VH wrote Dance the Night Away? No problem I wrote Goodbye to Romance

VH did Spanish Fly? No worries I did Dee

VH did Little Guitars? No worries I did Diary of a Madman

VH did Ain't Talkin' Bout Love, no worries I wrote the riff to Crazy Train

VH did some heavy stuff like Unchained? No worries I did heavy stuff on Believer.

VH did I'm the One? No worries I'm steady with my rhythm on I Don't Know.

it seemed like everytime EVH tried to do something, Randy would come in and be like you bet you cannot top this.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Not really, no.  

    First, Quiet Riot never got off the ground with Randy on guitars, mostly because he was hired on by Ozzy before QR got signed.  

    Second, neither Eddie nor Randy were very competitive guitarists.  They inspired a lot of competitive guitarists, but neither one ever claimed to be better than anyone else.  

  • 3 weeks ago

    They where in the same circles, they both had the same job as musician. Both also played guitar and where contributors to their respective bands. There is competition all the time, to sell more records to sell more tickets. To be the best of all time. Both Rhoads and EVH are two of the best to ever do it. Unfortunately for Rhoads he died well before he could really see his impact on music. Competition is everywhere in music, if you cant compete than you dont survive. But you also need to bare on mind, neither Rhoads nor EVH where the only parts of their bands. What made Van Halen, Quiet Riot and Ozzy Osbourne work was collaboration. Everyone doing their part. A dictatorship does not work, yes I am aware that EVH runs Van Halen. But the other members have their roles. They help to make the music flow. And EVH didnt write everything for Van Halen. Not one person is too big or too small in a band. No matter how big the band is.

  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    I think that each was obviously aware of the other's existence, but I don't think that either was really compelled to outdo the other. When you're talking about players of that calibre, you're talking about blokes who are so inconceivably talented that it's not going to cost them an ounce of respect or recognition for people to concede that there's at least one person out there who's better. 

    The two were roughly the same age and were contemporaries playing in the same scene around the same time, so it only stands to reason that there were plenty of people comparing them to each other at the time. But both Eddie and Randy were focused on what they were doing. The goal was to be able to make music - it wasn't to definitively answer the question of "who's better?" 

    Even now, nearly 45 years later, people still argue about whether Eddie or Randy was the first to incorporate tapping into his playing. It's just a silly argument. They were both highly skilled, technically proficient players who stood out. We could stand here and argue that Eddie was better until we're blue in the face or go on about how Randy was better until the cows come home. A strong argument could be made for either of them. But in the end it doesn't really matter.

    Remember that Randy came from a musical family. His musical training began at an early age. he learned how to play multiple instruments, he learned all about musical theory... But Eddie did everything by ear. To this day he can't read musical notation. Everything he knows about music he learned through trial and error. He never had any instruction when it came to technique - he did what he felt was right. How do you compare somebody who was groomed to be a virtuoso with somebody who's a self-made virtuoso? 

    The Eddie versus Randy argument is so old it's got whiskers on it. People have been talking this one to death for decades. Maybe if they were both still around it might be a question worth answering, but with Randy dead for 37 years now, it really doesn't make any sense to keep beating this dead horse. 

    Let's look at it this way, the two are/were at the very top when talking about guitar playing. There are only a handful of names when you're talking about people capable of playing at that level. So whether you want to believe that one was superior to the other, it really doesn't matter. I don't think that either was really capable of doing anything that the other couldn't have emulated back in 1982 - the last time it would have been sensible or fair to be talking about this. Personally I've always preferred Randy's playing, but I can definitely appreciate Eddie's less rigid and amorphous approach to playing and songwriting. 

    What I'm surprised no one ever asks about is what it might have sounded like if they'd had the opportunity to play TOGETHER. Imagine the intensity, the sheer incredulity of a band featuring Eddie and Randy - twin guitar attack, dueling leads, harmonies like you could never imagine. It would have been just magnificent. And if Randy had lived, it probably would have happened - maybe not a band but they likely would have shared a stage together at some point. 

    That would have been something very special indeed. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    I really dont think it is important enough to even recieve mention. 

    And I am sure both guitarists would feel the same way about the "notion" of any competition. 

    Source(s): nothing
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