Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 4 weeks ago

Why do people use the word, "hate", so much?

You've probably heard that, "hate", is considered to be a very strong word, and is meant for extreme dislike for something, but these days, people seem to think that, "hate", means is just a regular, dislike word. And while some people use the word for very truly bad things, I literally see people saying the word for not that bad things like, "I hate this mediocre movie/tv show/video game", "I hate this thing, but it is not the worst". I even see people saying, "I hate my family", "I hate (insert religion/race/country here)", or some even say, "I have an extreme hatred for (insert thing here)" which is going way too far. So, why do so many people use this word so much?

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    The answer is because most average people these days have a poor repertoire of memorized words, and bad grammar as well. Further, most people do not know the word's actual definition and appropriate meaning. 

    Yes "Hate" is a most overused and abused word. The other one is the F-Bomb, which is a noun, verb, adjective, and adverb for the illiterate and uneducated. 

    (I should make a bumper sticker out of that)

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  • 3 weeks ago

    often overused,,in informal conv among your  bffs,sharing stuff to grouse about is common,where the writer or speaker wishes to convey facets of a complex situation, this word and others become word fillers,mundane,dry,,,expediate, ( wrong,it is 'expedite') ,excetera,nucyuh ler,as per,true facts true history,past history,prior plans,prior history,future plans,various and sundry,excape,point n time,genral consensus,concensus of opinion,genril consensus of opinion. ( 'gen/rll' that is how bad word raconteurs make it sound) ,outer perimeter, loose lose,lossed lost,choose chose,,preboard prepay prequalify,prepay,preorder,preregister,regester, we'll,well,your,you're , would of,libary, to,too close proximity,general consensus,disorientating,nope nope,,origination,,nope,, word is origin,another couple, masonary,,as in bricklaying,,it is'masonry' not 'masonary'promissary,,as in 'promissary' note,,wrong,,it is promissory,,'promissory note'

    these are heard and seen   in writings  from people from 16 years old to post grad college

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  • 4 weeks ago

    They have a poor vocabulary.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    I share your feelings about this, and whenever I can do so without upsetting people, I say, 'Hate is a really strong word; I'm sure you just mean you really dislike your teacher, or you think raspberry icecream is yucky'. A lot of children simply don't realise how strong the word is, and are interested in and receptive to being told other ways to express a strong dislike.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Because of the shortness of the word. It's easy to say and directly communicates whats you want

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The same reason they must label everyone as either gorgeous or ugly, when in fact almost all people are ordinary looking. Part of it is lack of vocabulary (who reads any more?) and part of it is that adolescence comes with very intense emotions which young people must learn to sort out. That's why teens often have tantrums about mundane things. In their emotionally charged world, they do truly swing between extreme love and extreme hatred. However, they themselves realize that's not reality.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Maybe it became popular when George Bush started talking about how the  terrorists "hate our freedoms," as if that somehow explained the 9/11 attack.

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Some would attribute the desirability of hate as a sign of negative perceptions that seem to elevate the status of meanness and unhealthy emotions like "hate."

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Each persons language and situation is different and language is fluid. 

    I don't consider hate in every day context to be a strong word, but obviously you do. Right there is a difference that we have to respect.

    • Boomerful4 weeks agoReport

      So, you are saying that most of the people must accept illiteracy and poor language usage from some of the people?  Wouldn't that be a forced dumbing-down of a population? "Hate" is certainly one of the top misused words, in Western culture at least; next to 'racist' and the F-bomb.

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  • dgktk
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It's the same as the word "love". It is used to express strong feelings, thus they choose a stronger word to express that.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Exaggeration and dramatization seems to be in style these days. People are using words like terrified, devastated, and panicked for events that are merely, in fact, somewhat upsetting to a normal person. I often wonder what such people will say when something truly awful happens to them.

    • RE
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Dirt has become filth, ugly has become hideous, and tribal identity has become the politics of hatred.

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