Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 4 weeks ago

prohibition question?

I’m studying it and I just really can’t understand how this idea came into the platform? Was it religious puritans trying impose or what was the reasoning to ban such a large part of economic income?

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Religious motives were part of it.  Evangelical Christians had long been skeptical of drinking.  Back in the early 19th century, Americans drank immense amounts of booze and drunkenness was a major societal problem (think of it like the opiod epidemic of today or the crack problem in the 1980s).  Reformers blamed alcohol abuse for a lot of issues in society including industrial accidents, poverty, poor work ethic, and perhaps most ominously spousal abuse and neglect.  Over the course of the 19th century, reformers gradually brought down alcohol consumption both through laws which restricted its sale as well as moral suasion which changed peoples habits.  But even into the 20th century, some wanted to go even further and sought to ban alcohol outright.  The same sorts of arguments still applied.  Prohibitionists were concerned about alcohol abuse and the problems it caused, particularly for the family and for women, who made up the most strident prohibition crusaders.  While many people still advocated for "temperance" or the modest consumption of alcohol, others wanted a full on ban.  It helped the movement that by the 19th century the heaviest drinkers were generally immigrants such as Italians, Germans and Poles.  The mostly WASP temperance reformers saw these people as dubiously American at best and corrupting foreign influences at worst.  They saw the urban saloons where these people drank as hotbeds of corruption and as exploitative in the same way that we'd regard drug dealers today.  It's true that alcohol made a lot of money, but to temperance reformers and prohibitionists it was doing so by destroying people's lives.  While nativism played a role in prohibition, the prohibitionists honestly thought they were improving the lives of all people, perhaps especially the heavy drinkers who were most involved in consuming alcohol.

  • PAMELA
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It was led by the temperance society, mainly women, and a lot of working days were being lost due to men being drunk all the time.

  • .....
    Lv 4
    4 weeks ago

    It was Rockefeller who was, at the time trying to control fuel sources, he paid the women's prohibition league to petition the gov't to stop all production of booze just long enough so that the thousands of local fuel makers of high octane alcohol would cease to exist and Rockefeller (Standard Oil, who drilled in the middle east first) destroyed the economy of thousands of farmers who sold "City Gas"  . The Ford cars and trucks could run on alcohol, gas, diesel, kerosene - all different octane levels of fuel. Rockefeller single handedly destroyed the American farmer's freedom, and began the oil crisis we have today with fighting in the middle east, S. America, Russia, even with the chinese paying enemies of USA to get oil cheaper for their war machine.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Some people supported it for religious reasons but others supported it for the perceived moral or economic benefits that would come from banning it. Alcoholism was a problem in America and some people believed that by making alcohol illegal, this would reduce the amount of alcohol related crimes and increase worker productivity.

    Prohibition was ineffective because simply making something illegal does not mean that the public demand for the product would automatically drop to 0, and people who were willing to break the law to make money quickly stepped in to fulfill the demand for it and the government couldn't really counteract this. People still had the means to produce alcohol within the US, and they could also smuggle it in from Canada or Mexico where it was still legal.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    It was a group of church ladies that were upset with their husbands spending their pay check in saloons drinking and gambling instead of bringing the money home.

  • 4 weeks ago

    Henry Ford originally designed a carburetor that would work equally well on gasoline and distilled alcohol. John D Rockefeller, a huge oil tycoon knew that if people were allowed to distill their own whiskey, farmers would be able to sell it to passersby, thereby cutting Rockefeller out of the equation.

    He convinced Ford to redesign his carburetor so that it would work on refined gasoline only.

    While the temperance movement did call a lot of attention to the immoral aspects of alcohol, it wasn't gaining much strength until Rockefeller sunk a lot of his money into it.

  • 4 weeks ago

    "The driving force of the Prohibition movement was various religious organizations, who believed that less alcohol consumption would decrease the amount of crime, spousal abuse, and raise the overall amount of piety in America. ... The prohibition and women's suffrage movements created an alliance."

    “National prohibition of alcohol (1920-33) – the 'noble experiment' – was undertaken to reduce crime and corruption, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve health and hygiene in America."

    Pick which story you like, but remember it caused gang crime to thrive like never before.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Some of the impetus was religious; a lot of it, however, was an attempt to protect women from domestic violence at the hands of drunk husbands. There were a number of women's groups, some very conservative, and some very feminist, that supported prohibition.

  • 4 weeks ago

    its mainly because 1) doctors found out that it can cause health issues

    2) women mostly apposed alcohol because men would come home and beat them or their kids.

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