Anonymous
Anonymous asked in HealthMental Health · 3 weeks ago

Can I refuse treatment ?

Can I ask to stop my treatment for depression? My treatment for my eating disorder treatment is being stopped for now as my mood is to low to carry on with it so they say. So that’s stopping. I said I just want to stop my medication and seeing people like my CPN and mental health doctors, because I’m sick of it and it isn’t getting any better. My therapist said ours can stop but she’s not sure about the other because my mood is way to low and my weight can just drop. What will happen if I tell them I no longer want to go or do anything about it? No judgment please you don’t no the back story’s. 

22 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    yes, you can stop..............................

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    Yes, you can refuse. However, it is dangerous to stop immediately, and you WILL without some kind of help, get worse which could lead to you being sectioned if it is thought you are a danger to yourself. Eating disorders are very hard to combat--and they kill.

  • 3 weeks ago

    Yes and you can also pull open your eye sockets and stick a wire into your head and poke around at your brain with it until you fix what's wrong.

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    You’re an attention seeker

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  • 3 weeks ago

    You should drop the medication. It will do more harm than good. There are other treatments for depression which do not involve medication. Hypnotherapy, Neurofeedback, mindfulness training, EFT (emotional  freedom technique), ART, art and music music therapy, EMDR, etc. In your situation, with the eating disorder issue, I might go with hypnotherapy, But whatever you decide to do, stay away from the drugs. Take it from somebody whose life was seriously damaged by these substances. They do more harm than good. And a lot of that harm cannot be undone if you’re as unfortunate as I have been. Just my two cents. Maybe see a naturopath or holistic health practitioner as well to rule out endocrine, hormonal and other  physiological issues. The biological underpinnings of “mental illness”are often overlooked. Psychiatrists and psychotherapists rarely bother to establish a physiological baseline before recommending or instituting (neurotoxic) drug treatment.  They prefer to prescribe neurotoxic chemical drugs ($$$) which often make symptoms worse, create new symptoms altogether, or just mask them at best, rather than getting at the root of the problem. “Above all do no harm.” How many of them actually pay any attention to THAT admonition? VERY few, in my experience. Profit and greed are too enticing for many of them.

  • 3 weeks ago

    you have the right to refuse treatment. seek a professional advice with your physician. weight out the pros and cons of your decision and make an educated choice 

  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    UK answer

    You can only be forced to receive treatment if you're deemed to be a danger to yourself or others. If you've expressed suicidal thoughts or your weight is so low your life is at risk they could in theory section you and hospitalise you against your will. If it came to that you always have the right to choose a voluntary admission over being sectioned. 

    Another thing to bear in mind is that suddenly stopping psych meds is dangerous and unless you slowly taper off them you risk becoming very unwell both mentally and physically. If you do choose to go ahead with refusing treatment you simply need to write a formal letter to your care coordinator (your CPN) stating that you are discharging yourself from their services as of today's date. 

    Be sure that this is what you want as it can difficult to get these services again if your weight isn't critically low. 

  • 3 weeks ago

    If you are of legal age and of sound mind then you can chose to stop treatment.

    As an eating disorder is classed as a mental health issue, as is depression, there is an argument that your mind is not in a fit state to make this decision, so your guardian, next of kin etc may be able to make the decision on tour behalf.

    If you can give your treatment team a rational argument why treatment should be stopped, it is more likely to be stopped or, at least, the medications altered.

    • Autumn
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      That's not how things work in the UK.

  • Byrd
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    I think I smell a troll

  • 3 weeks ago

    I was in there twice and I don't care if people stigmatize me.  I have healthy self-esteem for the most part. I am in college, have an awesome boyfriend and kind of cute.  Best wishes!I was never cuffed and the cops didn't think I was a threat and the doctor said that both times were not necessary   Inpatient.  I was at those at 16 and 17.  I have Bi-Polar 1.  I am perfectly normal and cute.  haha.  ok

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