Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceCareers & EmploymentLaw & Legal · 4 weeks ago

If an employee has a doctor note confirming OCD, & his condition makes him refuse to do certain tasks, will that be waived on his evaluation?

Let’s say a file clerk at a firm has OCD, and although he works hard, the only task he pouts/complains about being asked to do is going to the post office (walking distance) or messenger run (walking distance or transit). His excuse: he’s busy (but all he’s doing is straightening “crooked” things). Keep in mind he, his fellow file clerks, and their supervisor wear walkie talkies. Whenever the supervisor asks him on walkie to go to the post office or deliver/pickup a package, the employee with OCD doesn’t respond. So the supervisor says, “Copy?” and he responds “Yes” in a pouty manner. Also, the receptionist has a walkie-talkie. Whenever she pages our department, “Guys, pick up” with no explanation as to why she’s paging us, he doesn’t respond.  But if she pages us, “Guys, can someone [perform task]?” without saying “Guys, pick up” first, he responds depending on whether or not the task is messenger/post office run or something INSIDE the office. That way, he won’t be stuck doing it by responding “yes.” Since his doctor note confirms he has OCD, will his constant refusal/asking someone else to do it, not be mentioned on his year-end evaluation, since his condition makes it very important to keep everything in the office neat and exact? Or is he still acting like a baby for complaining/pouting, and therefore could most likely get a 3% raise instead of 5%, for example?  I’m not assuming how much he would get, but just making a point about whether his raise will still be affected

10 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago

    I would waive this person right out of my employment. There wouldn't be any future evaluation for a raise.

  • 4 weeks ago

    No, of course not.  If you cannot perform the job, then you shouldn't have accepted it.  The doctor's note is for your information only.  It has nothing to do with your employer.  The only time a doctor's note means anything to an employer is when the employer requires proof that you were too sick to be at work, which is not the case here.  If you cannot do the job expected of you, find a job that you are able to do.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    A 5% raise is a pretty good raise, I wouldn't even bet on 3%.

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    If it's an essential part of the job, no, he can be disciplined or fired. Having a disability doesn't mean the employee can just refuse to do a part of the job he just doesn't happen to like. And if he's perfectly willing to skip the straightening crooked things for any other tasks, he has weakened his case considerably. But if his main job since he's a file clerk is filing, and he does a real good job on that, and the messenger runs are only incidental and aren't a task everyone else hates too, why is this such a big deal to you?

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  • martin
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    This is a management decision, but good management would handle this carefully, talking in private with the employee in question, then sending a general written message to all employees about workers with disabilities.

  • Teal
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    He is entitled to reasonable accommodation. These accommodations would have been negotiated between him and his employer. He can't be penalized in his evaluation for anything that was understood by him and his employer to be covered by their agreement. Any unprofessional behavior or poor performance that happens in spite of his accommodations is fair game though. You need to stay out of it. It's not your place to comment on his disability or make assumptions about what he needs. It's HR's problem.

  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    He will be fired. Period.

  • Eva
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    OCD is no excuse for him to refusing to do a task. He should do his share of the runs and be disciplined if he doesn't. Things in the office can't be continually out of order and there's no reason to keep him if he can't do his assigned tasks. OCD is not a protected disability.

  • 4 weeks ago

    thats up to the managers to decide

  • Greg
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Of course not. The tasks required for the job are required. If you have a disability but can still do your job you are protected, but if your disability prevents you from doing the job, you can be terminated for cause.

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