What's a poetic term that's common in English literature for ''A place people get drunk in''?

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  • 1 month ago

    People can drink alcohol in bars, pubs, taverns, clubs. 'Tavern' and 'pub' are used quite frequently in some literature, but are not necessarily poetic. Oh--I forgot 'saloon'--they don't make those anymore!

  • 1 month ago

    Public house, or 'pub' for short. Tavern. 'Bar' is not especially poetic.

    • curtisports2
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      I agree on 'pub' but not the full name 'public house'. 'Watering hole' is not very poetic, either. It's where lower animals hydrate. If you think comparing humans to lower animals is poetic....

  • RP
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    One of the more unusual is "watering hole," meaning a place where folks drink.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      A watering hole is never poetic. The only 'poetic' term is 'tavern'.

  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Tavern or Hostelry

    Inn or Public House

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  • Cara
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    An inn, or a tavern.

  • 1 month ago

    The White House.

  • Roger
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    watering hole (This is a metaphor: animals drink at watering holes, just as people drink in bars.)

  • 1 month ago

    pub, roadhouse, inn

    • ron h
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      I think of an "inn" as a place to sleep.  

  • Bob
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    speakeasy .

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