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Can you help me with English please?

We lent John £200.

I will lend you my towel.

1. What does "lend" mean in this case?

2. I can't understand this expression exactly. Please explain to me clearly.

Thanks!

5 Answers

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  • geezer
    Lv 7
    8 months ago
    Favourite answer

    We lent John £200

    means that you gave him £200, but he has to pay it back.

    I will lend you my towel

    means that you can use my towel, but you have to give it back.

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    The act of lending means giving somebody else the use of something which is yours.

    If I have £200 to spare I could lend it to a friend if he/she needs a sum of £200 to use. I would tell him/her how long they could borrow it for (days, weeks, etc).

    L:ikewise, my friend seems to have forgotten to bring his towel with him today as we are going swimming. I will lend him my towel.

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  • 8 months ago

    Lend means to let somebody use something temporarily.

    1. "We lent John £200." This means that you gave John some money and expect him to pay it back. In the case of money, the borrower often has to pay back a little more than was borrowed. This extra money is called "interest".

    2. "I will lend you my towel." You are offering to let somebody use your towel. They are expected to return it.

    In either case, the words "lend" (present tense) and "lent" (past tense) means that you expect the item to be returned. If you did not expect it to be returned, you would "give" it instead of "lend" it.

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  • drip
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    lend

    /lend/

    verb

    1.

    grant to (someone) the use of (something) on the understanding that it shall be returned.

    "Stewart asked me to lend him my car"

    Borrow.

    We lent John $200. We John $200 with the understanding he will pay it back.

    I will let you borrow my towel.

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  • J
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Let you use the towel, but not keep it.

    "Lent" is past tense.

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