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Should I have to move for a bicyclist on a apartment trail path if he is coming at me if i'm a pedestrian?

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  • Ron
    Lv 6
    8 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Technically no, but out of decency I would step aside and greet them with a hello.

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  • 8 months ago

    Is it a walking path or a bike path? What's a trail path?

    • Bobby Lee8 months agoReport

      Both, I live in the northwest, it has signs of wild life conservation all through it with small trails on the side. The path is very long an it is for everybody. I'm tired of arrogant cyclists, not just here too.

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  • 8 months ago

    you should both be to the right of the path...no one should need to move for the other. if there really is only room for 1 person, yes you need to move to the side to let the faster person pass

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      8 months agoReport

      so, in theory, a cyclist can legally plow into a pedestrian who isn't fast enough to jump out of the way? In my area such a cyclist would risk a severe beating, while awaiting arrest for assault and battery.

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  • Bill
    Lv 6
    8 months ago

    really you can stand your ground and get hurt . You make up your mind which is less painful

    the law states that the cyclist should not be on the foot path but that is little consolation when you are bleeding all over the place

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    • Bill
      Lv 6
      8 months agoReport

      it is a FOOT path not a bicycle path and foot paths are for feet --cheeze doesn't any one have intelligence any more . you ride bikes on special made cycle paths or roads . Cyclists do not have rights as you claim other than to be law abiding citizens and have a care for other people on foot

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  • 8 months ago

    There is a local bike trail. Two guys were riding at night. They did a head-on collision and were killed.

    • Bobby Lee8 months agoReport

      Scary an unfortunate, I wonder if they were at least wearing helmets.

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  • 8 months ago

    you shouldnt have to but i move anyways so he dont hit me

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  • D J
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Why are you moving for the good of someone else? Do what is best for you!

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    • John8 months agoReport

      That depends on whether or not you are ok with having a cyclist collide into you (which could be pretty painful.) If you are not, then you probably should move. If you are asking about what the law says, that depends on local law where you live.

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  • DEBS
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    Cyclists have a responsibility to ride safely. They cannot be going 15+ MPH and expect a clear path the entire time. That said, if it's a mulit-purpose path, then treat it as one.

    If you'd move over for another walker, then do the same for a cyclist. If you, for some odd reason, don't move out of the way for a jogger or walker, then I guess you can continue your irrational behavior with the cyclist.

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  • Snezzy
    Lv 7
    8 months ago

    The pedestrian generally has the right of way, but because of the bicycle's momentum and the difficulty of swerving the bicycle to avoid a collision, it might be a very good idea for the pedestrian to be polite and move aside.

    In Massachusetts years ago we discovered that a governmental "trails committee" wanted to put in regulations that would establish separate trails for the various uses. Some for bicycles, some for hikers, some for four-wheeler enthusiasts, some for horses, and a very few for motorcycles. Very little mixed usage.

    We got together with the various trail users and pointed out that this was "divide and conquer" and that nobody would be allowed on most of the trails. Our own experiences as horsemen convinced us that sharing trails with those other people was easy, friendly, and fun. Indeed, we sometimes took our horses out to help do construction work in places that had become inaccessible because of washouts. -- Can't get a tractor in there, but one horse with a proper harness (or even a Western saddle) and a strong rope can pull that culvert back into position!

    Work with other trail users. Become their friends. And try to educate the ones who want to ban certain kinds of people and vehicles.

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