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Anonymous asked in Home & GardenMaintenance & Repairs · 9 months ago

please put this in home repair. How can you tell when a house window needs replacement.?

Update:

I have lived here for 40 years. The house was built about 6-7 years before I moved in. I

am the second owner. Thank you y/a community.

Update 2:

I will be 67 in November and the savings on new windows would take years.

6 Answers

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  • y
    Lv 7
    9 months ago
    Favourite answer

    Questions can't be moved around anymore.

    Guess it depends where one is but in new England,

    If they are not at least double pane, if their is dirt or a build up between the panes it means they are leaking and need to be replaced, If they are difficult to open or close, If the wind seems to blow through them, if there is too much rot and such.  At your age, put plastic over them and use the money for something you like.

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  • 9 months ago

    3 kinds of windows are out there, modern aluminum,vinyl,glass,,double pane

    wood sash upper & lower puttied windows at the rabbets, ( angle of the joint where glass meets the window seam)

    from the 60s back a hundred or two hundred years,,putty was used,,glass cut either on site, or in the shop,,,windows like these lasted 80 years needing only washing occasionally,some spots of dried putty replaced with fresh stuff,glass cleaned with rags warm water and pumice.

    My apt in a 100 year brick 2 flat were all clean clean reputtied by me in ;92,,using daubs of linseed oil before bedding the glass in,a curved flat knife to smooth in the newputty brand I used.all wood surfaces cleaned with a belt sander, then painted a couple windows at a time,till all were done, heat insulation is still pretty good,sounds outside are muffled,,my ft door closes a bit hard because the space is sealed tight.

    I must frankly redo about 3 northfacing windows because a leak upstairs caused putty deterioration.,,the old techniques worked well,as anon above says,,wood sashes puttied and properly treated last & last.

    signs your window issue is an issue, drafts,,windows do not close all the way and close tightly,windows rattle when a door is opened,,that indicates weak air currents cause heat and coll air loss,besides eventually causing glass to crack,

    noise from outside is more pronounced.

    cracked glass,,sticky windows to raise and lower,to the point where a window breaks with a slam.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    The question is in the right place. Windows need replacing when they leak and you can't fix them. Other wise the glass is good for 100 years. I got aluminum sliding windows so the only way I improved the was to use that clear shrink plastic on the inside to insulate them and leave it on 24/7/365 . Even a 1/8" air space between the glass and the plastic is like 6" of insulation which matters during a snowy winter. My windows still open...for fresh air for the warm days otherwise I can see through them just fine.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    A house built in the early 70s? I am surprised the windows have lasted this long if they are timber. It comes down to the character of the house and the style of windows and their condition. Changing them to plastic may well lower the value if they are out of keeping and depending on how long you plan to live there you may not recover the cost of replacing them.

    My windows are 140 years old and still going strong. My neighbours have replaced theirs with plastic and are now troubled with condensation and in so doing have spoilt the look of a terrace that survived WW2.

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  • 9 months ago

    It’s shifted and may be difficult to open or close, condensation is forming between the storm and interior glass, the wood surrounding the frame has deteriorated, causing damage.

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  • 9 months ago

    Either it leaks or there's a crack in it.

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