Drumming problems related to the metronome.?

Hello all, So I ve been working with my drummer for 5 years, we ve established the need for the metronome.. I record the guitar and vocals first onto a metronome timed by beats per minutes, and then he records onto that. we ve been having a lot of trouble with this, as he complains often of the metronome being off, or feeling as though a beat here and there is missing or one is added... For instance, I try to make sure the song sounds right, so this recent track I m working on is at 145, but was orignally at 150, what would that do? would that add or take away a beat? what would be the consequences of this? why are we having so much trouble?

Update:

Thank you all for coming to the aid of this issue, you have all collectively taught me a lot. I would like to add more details to the issues.

1) I play on time when there is an issue I go back and fix it.

2) Problem with Time Signature or the sub divisions? we know little about both. if that's a problem, can you tell why I am able to play my guitar parts perfectly fine within a 4/4 T.S.?

3) Would it be a viable solution if the Drummer played with the metronome but slowly went out of the 4/4?

5 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    no you should just record it live then do guitars and vocals after the drum track is laid. You always want bass and drums to be the bottom and first recorded tracks - the rest of the band sits on top of that.

    Start with getting bass and drums recorded then do guitar, vocals, keys, horns, etc.

    • Mamianka
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      This works work best - if only this drummer could COUNT and actually stay with a metronome. A drummer with no feel for rhythm, or cannot find the beat!

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  • 5 months ago

    You need a better musician - like a music teacher or experienced performer - to listen to you both. One or BOTH of you are off, and just plain can't tell - so you blame the other one. Metronome does not lie - but it's often ignored. I have students that when I tell them to tap their foot, do so - but it has NOTHING to do with what they are playing! Random foot taps . . . so we have to break things down. I have to TEACH THEM how to stay with the beat and its subdivisions. Betcha you guys would benefit from this.

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  • Tony B
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    The beats per minute (BPM) only affects is the tempo. Obviously you need to ensure it's working properly and really does, consistently play the right number of beats.

    You also need to ensure that you really are playing in time with the metronome and that the number of beats you play in each bar matches it.

    Try going through it counting beats with the drummer until you both agree that you and the metronome is right.

    I once knew someone who would record demos of himself singing to a steady metronome pulse. He could keep in time with the pulse but ignored bar lengths. A song might begin with both him and the metronome agreeing that the emphasised beat was “1” but it might be anything as the song progressed!

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  • 5 months ago

    Changing a song's BPM doesn't add or subtract any beats. Assuming that your software doesn't have a glitch, one of you is not keeping time. I think the simplest way to approach this is for you to play your part along with a click-track or metronome at the tempo you want. Then have the drummer record to your track without using the metronome. If he thinks you're dropping a beat, it will be easy to play back that location and identify what's going on.

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    • Mamianka
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Had a friend in music school , trumpet major, who was ADAMANT that he was counting 7/4 correctly. Out loud:

      ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX SEV - EN. That's how the face palm got invented . . .

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  • 5 months ago

    I wonder if your timing is out of phase with what the clicks are telling the drummer's ears, or maybe you're treating the metronome as a suggestion. Work off a temporary drum track or pipe one into your headphones to see if that locks you in better.

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