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Lv 6
. asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 5 months ago

What subjects do you need to study to write sci-fi novels?

Astronomy, physics, chemistry...

And how much?

Update:

At least have deep insight in those subjects.

51 Answers

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  • 5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Actually you don't really NEED any of that

    but it's true that some of the best scifi novels were written by real scientists (people with doctorates in one or more of the sciences), like Asimov and Clarke.

    Basically: the more you know of any particular science

    the fewer scientific errors you will make in your novels that include fictional aspects of that particular science.

    so

    for example

    if you have a novel with interstellar or intergalactic space travel

    the more you know about astronomy and physics

    the fewer scientific errors your novel with contain when describing that sort of travel

    so

    for example

    if you have a novel with a substance with unusual chemical or biological properties

    the more you know about chemistry and/or biology

    the fewer scientific errors your novel with contain when describing those properties

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  • 5 months ago

    It will hurt nothing to be as conversant with at least the topics you focus on. If you deal with specifics, you should read up on those. No reason to make a laughing stock of yourself through total ignorance. However, a great deal of sf wants to depend on future tech, so the current status quo only needs a base. Issac Arthur has a neat topic selection on futurisim which could set you up nicely, and painlessly. A great resource.

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  • 5 months ago

    Those things help as does some experience with psychedelic drugs probably, a la Aldous Huxley, but I’m not recommending that. You could become psychotic, worse case scenario...

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  • 5 months ago

    ask or text STEPHAN KING

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  • chorle
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Accounting seemed to have served Robert Asprin well.

    Marketing would be a good idea too if you plan to be a modern author.

    Anything that will get you a good job to support you the 20 years it takes to become an overnight success.

    Although it is useful to keep up with science and research parts that apply to your story is you write about a strange undersea creature attacking an oil rig like Paul E Cooley's The Black it wouldn't hurt to know a little about oil rigs, undersea life, and underwater robot cameras.

    Like Nineteenthly indicated a good story is more important than good science and an audience will forgive some Handwavyum if the story is good.

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  • John
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    You can never know too much. Start today!

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  • 5 months ago

    Architecture and applied math or statistics. You need both an abstract and concrete thought process.

    • Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      ...as long as it is real Math, not "Common Core."

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Nothing. No cost at all.

    Fiction. Not true. Just make it up in some crazy logic and justify it yourself. Actually, if you listened in class from elementary to high school, you should get by perfectly. Most don't so there, crappy sci-fi stories.

    If you did go to college and studied any of those sciences, you wouldn't be writing sci-fi. You'd hate it and stick to the truth instead.

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    • Sharon
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      my astronomy professor has had one time travel novel published, along with probably 30 short stories

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  • 5 months ago

    Creative writing. One only needs enough science fact to make a fiction story seem logical.

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  • 5 months ago

    Nothing. Most SF nowadays is mushy soft like Star Trek or Doctor Who, and the authors make up "sciency" sounding stuff as they go along. It's been like that since the '60s.

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  • 5 months ago

    Just Movies would do

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