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Does a 4 way speaker system create 4 channels, each of isolated instrumentation?

I have a 4 way surround sound speaker system I'm about to recycle because I got angry with its malfunctions and broke it. Ik. Dumb of me.

I'm wondering what buying another 4 way surround sound speaker system will do for me as a music lover who loves to hear the different channels, where you can hear the other instruments more clearly. This is just for my pc. I want to know if a 4 way speaker system will divide each channel, making like a left and right speaker system for let's say the Left channel, and a left and right speaker system for the Right. I want to know if it divides the instrumentation even more so.

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  • 8 months ago

    A 4 way speaker system refers to a single speaker with 4 separate drivers.

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  • 8 months ago

    Four speakers could be interpreted in different ways. It might imply three-way stereo in the front with a subwoofer, or two front speakers and two rear speakers. By three-way stereo, I mean that a signal present in both the left and right channels would come out of the center speaker, and what's just on the left stays on the left while what's just on the right stays on the right.

    I suppose what you might enjoy most is Dolby Atmos and its DTS counterpart, but putting two speakers in the ceiling may be more trouble than it's worth.

    I'm satisfied with a 5.1 system, but while I recommend you try Blu-ray Audio discs, you may want to begin with 3-D MIDI software that can let you space instruments so different sounds are in different channels.

    http://images.bit-tech.net/content_images/2005/10/...

    https://www.dolby.com/us/en/technologies/home/dolb...

    https://dts.com/dtsx#

    https://www.dolby.com/us/en/technologies/dolby-pro...

    www.aixrecords.com

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  • 8 months ago

    my system is a mutt most everything used outfit,klh speakers,home 3ft tall plywood w oak finish speakers I bought in the 70s,,remodeled with pyledriver woofers, a panasonic amfm stereo cassette rec;r from ;71,,( still works) a total of 6 recievers,25 speakers,it delivers i guess 800 wpc total, ( according to my rather good ears,,they are rms watts)

    jazz off you tube,from the 40s on,classical, classical guitar concerts, sound for me & 3 houses any direction ( daylight loud,they go quiet after dark) true to live sound it makes,esp audio off the laptop jack plugged into the blower,( yamaha 5.1 surround, played as stereo,,,me in the audience,,that means ;live tru to life concerts,,it works nice)

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  • 9 months ago

    No, it does not. Only if the recording has four or more channels, can the speakers then reproduce the distinct signals sent to them by the receiver in use.

    If the receiver cannot do such a thing, then the speakers also cannot give you such sound.

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  • 9 months ago

    "Four Way isn't the term, and means something else in audio-ligua. what you had was a Quadraphonic, or four SPEAKER system. Today, the base system is, in your terms, "Five Way", plus a special effects tap for a woofer/amplifier-in-a-box add on. The fifth channel feeds a center speaker that usually hands out voice tracks, so people can put a speaker underneath the TV to enhance the illusion that actors are speaking out of the TV. The center speaker is most helpful when the left and right are too far from each other to center the dialog properly, given the room space and acoustics, Anyway, its called Surround sound.

    Very old PCs may only have a four speaker or quadraphonic ability, usually synthesized, not really handling five separately recorded music tracks, one for each speaker. All recordings are mixed so that hopefully, a stereo effect - the illusion that your two ears "see" instruments and events positioned in the room space, not blaring from the speakers, is the point. This means the instruments played CANNOT be confined to any one speaker, but MUST be distributed so that the apparent source of the instruments seems to your ears to be at one place or another IN THE ROOM. This illusion can be very strong, if the speakers are very good, and placed properly considering the room. An instrument blaring out only from one speaker would tell your ears that the sound was coming right from that speaker which is largely not desirable. The rear speakers generally add only an additional sense of space, as in, behind me. The left right mixing illusion is done in the recording studio, and expects the front to have a single left and one right speaker to reproduce the illusion correctly, and the engineer works in the center channel so as to hopefully not disturb the magic to much. The rear image similarly. Since desktop speakers are rarely more than four or so feet from one another, it is usually not necessary to have a center "fill in", or fifth channel.

    Bad speakers or poor placement of them kills the music playing in space - not from the boxes, illusion. So you don't want to mess with it by using "more" speakers. It just screws up the sound engineers hard work. How clear and precisely placed the individual instrument will seem depends on the quality of the speakers, not their number. Ten skunks do not smell like a rose just ten skunks.

    Six , seven, Et all type surround systems can divide the sound up further, but in the main, are useful for large rooms, increasing the number of side-wall speakers, which puts more distant listeners closer to the ambience, or "rear" sounds. They can also include more direction clues to fool your ears, and aid listeners in big spaces like in movie theaters, that usually have this problem due to their size. .

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  • 9 months ago

    NO! The only way to have playback broken down by instrument is to have a multi-track recording and then have that spacialized!

    You need to visit a HiFi specialist so they can demonstrate how this works!

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