Networking - Reserved IP Addresses?

IF I have a reserved IP Address on a 10.249.90* subnet for example and I move location or office were the subnet is e.g 10.249.50 or 172.** would it still connect to the assigned IP?

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    you cant connect if you move because 10.x.x.x is not a public internet address. it is rather an internal address where it is set from the router at the office. If you move, you have to setup the address again according to the router assigned ip address.

    Another known internal addresses are 192.168.x.x. It is used for intranet LAN and not Internet.

    Source(s): I'm an MCSE
  • BigE
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    It depends on how the network is subnetted. A /8 is in the same broadcast domain because it is 10.?.?.?, but

    not a /24 because network 10.249.50.? and 10.249.90.? are in different networks or broadcast domains. You cannot have an ip for the wrong network and expect it to work right. And a /16 WOULD work because both are in 10.249.?.?.

    dhcp servers are configured with scopes/ranges and they won't give out an IP that is not on the correct network.

  • Lv 7
    2 months ago

    not on a different network. 10.* is a private network that cannot be seen elsewhere.

  • P
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I suppose it would depend on how their firewalls\DNS\DHCP server(s) are setup, but generally each specific location on their own subnet will require IP's issued on the specific subnet. I would assume that the reserved ip would not be available at locations on a different subnet.

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  • 2 months ago

    Well if you are thinking to buy an IP address, first of all you need to know it’s inner story. It is an unique identity assigned to any machine connected online to setup communication by identification and addressing. Moreover there are certain terms to highlight about Private IP addresses that are reserved to be used privately on a specific network.

  • VP
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    There's not enough info to give a complete answer.

  • 2 months ago

    Yes because it's still on the same network and the one router assigns an ip to a mac address, meaning if you tell the router that mac address X is assigned to IP Y, it does not matter where the mac physically moves to if it is still tied into the same network for the router to identify.

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