Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 10 months ago

How can a person survive a lightning strike?

People have died after being electrocuted by a phone charger, yet there are stories and many cases of people being hit by a lightning and actually surviving. How is that possible? A lightning has up to 100 million volts of electricity, how is it possible for a human to survive that?

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  • Amy
    Lv 7
    10 months ago
    Favourite answer

    It depends on what part of your body gets electrocuted.

    If lightning passes through your arm and leg, it probably won't kill you; if it passes through your heart, it will definitely kill you.

    • Penny10 months agoReport

      How? Does the blood boil and cook the meat instantaneously? Does the water in the blood expand and blow the muscle to bits? Does it short circuit the electrical currents in the body that tell it what and how to function, causing the meat to die slowly from lack of oxygen?

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  • goring
    Lv 6
    10 months ago

    as per Gauss law which indicates that the electric field in an enclosure is zero.

    One can survive a strike by entering a metal enclosure.

    How ever no one can really predict when lightning strikes.Hence one is at the mercy of the weather.

    survival means how much hair on the head and other means of insulation the body has.

    There has been people who have survived

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    If they're lucky

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  • 10 months ago

    It really just depends on where you were hit. If you were hit in the head or in the heart you would most likely die. But if it hits for example your arms or legs you might not die. most people survive lightning strike but have permanent injuries.

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    The charge Q is not so high (very few decades of Coulomb)

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  • Jim
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    You'd survive if you were in a full suit of armor!

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    A lot of luck.'''''''''''''''''

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  • 10 months ago

    It basically has to do with the path the current takes.

    Anyone working with high power electrical systems will know the left pocket rule - place your left hand in your left trouser pocket. This creates a path for current to ground that bypasses your heart and internal organs.

    The path that lightning current takes is affected by many things ... how sweaty your skin is, how you are standing, what clothing you are wearing, the belt buckle you have, the material the soles of your shoes are made from, etc. There is no one factor. It just so happens that the conditions are such that a person struck by lightning (usually indirectly) happened to be subjected to a current that flowed through a path that allowed them to survive.

    Sheer fluke is probably the best description!

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  • 10 months ago

    Because it’s not the volt that kills you, it’s the amp. Ever been to a science museum where you touch this metal pole and your hair starts to stand, like you’re having a really bad hair day. That’s the Tesla coil. It has high voltage but very low current (amperage).

    When hit by lightning, you’re not completing a circuit. Most people die due to being burnt to a crisp. It’s when you become part of the circuit that kills you. The electricity interrupts your heart beat which is what kills you.

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    • Penny10 months agoReport

      What factors cause one to be burned to a crisp versus stopping the heart and leaving the body intact?

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  • Anonymous
    10 months ago

    I will tell you exactly how friend lightning is an extremely high voltage. It has to be to be able to jump from the ground all the way to the cloud. Because the voltage is so tremendously high it passes through your body so fast that it doesn't form heat as much as a lower voltage will form. Subsequently it doesn't damage your body tissues as much as a lower voltage can. It can still stop your heart but your heart might start beating by itself again or somebody might be able to revive you with CPR. If you receive a shock from a lower voltage. It might not pass through you as fast and it might actually do you more damage then a much higher voltage. The people that work on the 15000 v high tension wires wear a mesh suit in the rain and the electricity passes right through their body and out the other side and they don't die

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