Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesBooks & Authors · 10 months ago

Do I have what it takes to be a writer?

Hello! I am a sophomore in high-school(fifteen) and was wondering if I have what it takes to be a writer and if you have any writing tips/practices I should be doing.

I think I have what it takes. I write over a page everyday. I read everyday; I take notes on what I read; I have a journal for the random ideas that pop into my head— also one for copy-writing and one for vocabulary words I find in the books I read. I do that so I am always learning new words.

I want to be a writer. I don t mind being a bit poor; I just want to write stories. I don t think my writing itself is that great, though. I practice and I guess that s most important. But I was wondering if you have any tips? Other stuff I should do?

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  • 10 months ago

    I guess you do.

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    We can't tell, because we haven't seen your writing. We have no idea whether you have any talent. That's the fundamental pre-requisite for a writing career. All of the good habits in the world won't help you if you have no talent.

    You really need to get an experienced instructor or writer to take a look at your work. And even if the verdict is that you DO have potential, you need to take classes, get serious criticism, to hone your skills and your style.

    Good luck.

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  • 10 months ago

    As long as you put your mind to it you can accomplish anything in this world

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      Exactly, Diane. It's nice to encourage people, and certainly we can all do more than we realise, but it simply is not true that we can accomplish anything as long as we put our mind to it.

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  • 10 months ago

    We can't possibly know whether you 'have what it takes'. In terms of what you're doing, you're doing the right things: but anyone might do all those things but still not 'have what it takes'.

    The most important thing is to read, and read, and read, as much and as widely as you can, and notice what you're reading, notice - or try to work out - how certain effects are achieved.

    Yes, you should be writing every day, but remember that practising something over and over THE WRONG WAY won't improve your skills, it'll only reinforce bad habits. So find someone you can trust to read your work with an objective eye, maybe join a writers' group.

    And meanwhile, note the difference between 'everyday' and 'every day'. "Annie liked to dress up on Saturdays but during the week she wore her everyday clothes every day."

    By the way, I'm curious about what you mean by 'copy-writing'.

    And I wonder why you think it's necessary to talk about 'vocabulary words' rather than just 'vocabulary' or simply 'words'. A vocabulary is made up of words: there are no words that are not in a vocabulary.

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  • 10 months ago

    As a published author, let me tell you that not everyone is going to like your writing. I am lucky now because I have an agent who pushes the work for me and now even get jobs writing screenplays for films you may have seen, but when I was starting off, I had some publishers tell me my work was crap and the exact same submission would get so much praise by another company and they would publish me. The best advice I can give you is to write the way you write and you will automatically mature as a writer. The real trick is to find the right agent for you. You sound young, so start looking now because this can take time. Good Luck.

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  • 10 months ago

    Well, it sounds like you're doing a lot of things right, and at 15 you're still young and have many years to learn.

    What I would add to your list is to study the craft of writing, such as how to write good dialogue tags, three point and five point story structure, beats, how to end sentences with a power word, different sentence structure for various effects, showing vs. telling, and much, much more. There are a lot of internet resources on this, and I think that the sooner you learn all of this (not to say that rules shouldn't be broken, but they're best broken when you know what you're doing), the more you'll get out of that one page of words you write every day and the faster you'll improve.

    Best of luck! Hope you see your books on the shelves in a 5-10 years. :)

    • Marli
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      I agree; but I'll still lead cheers for the library over the internet alone, if only because the research information is in categories in the library building, while it's all over the internet.

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  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    There's no way for us to tell, without seeing your work.

    It's perfectly possible for someone to do everything that YOU do, but everything they write is a load of drivel.

    It's also possible that you're very good.

    But don't imagine that you'd realistically be able to make a living from writing novels. That's extremely rare. You might, if you're really talented, get paid work as a journalist, but otherwise, there's not much money to be made as a writer.

    Start off with it as a hobby, get qualified for a job which would pay you a regular monthly salary, and see how that works out. If you got published, earned a lot of money, and were commissioned to write further novels, then of course it's possible for you to continue.

    Good luck!

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  • 10 months ago

    I started writing when I was in 5th or 6th grade and was first commercially published when I was going into my Sophomore year of high school. I was very lucky and had an English teacher who helped me and encouraged encouraged me to write. II usually wrote several pages every day and med with my mentor once a week. I took additional English classes including creative writing classes at a community college during the summer breaks. I submitted my first manuscript for publication at 16 and with several re-writes was finally published just before my 18th birthday. I am now almost 75 and have been published several times and have a good career as a writer.

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  • j153e
    Lv 7
    10 months ago

    If you love your topic/ideas/characters, then you understand them. That's key for attuning with your inner child or soul, where true creativity and ideas are received.

    Related:

    "Shakespeare's Window into the Soul" by Martin Lings;

    "Creation: Artistic and Spiritual" by Omraam Aivanhov;

    "Understanding Yourself" by Mark Prophet;

    "For Couples Only" by Shaunti Feldhahn (for character perspective);

    "The Great Divorce" by C. S. Lewis (for character development);

    "West with the Night" by Beryl Markham for example of unique voice;

    "Autobiography of a Yogi" by Paramhansa Yogananda for awareness of love.

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    • j153e
      Lv 7
      10 months agoReport

      meditation, and is worth recommending, even as Martin Lings' "Shakespeare's Window into the Soul," for both are dealing with that differently focused type of "Interior Castle" or "Pilgrim's Progress" character development.

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  • 10 months ago

    How do you expect people who don't know you to know if you have what it takes to be a writer?

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