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If a model or acting talent agency chooses you to be a model or actor for their company would you do stuff locally in their city or move?

I ask because let’s say you send out a resume to a talent agency do you model mostly for them in the current city or if you happen to do really well if your an actor or model would they tell you to go to a bigger city tell you the location where you need to go.

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  • John P
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    Work for models and actors (two very different professions) tends to be confined to certain cities, except for stage work for actors. Therefore you would do well to move to those areas if you want work.

    Note that in porn movies, the actors are, strangely, often called "models".

    And do be careful of scams, "agencies" promising lots of work if only you will pay them lots of money.

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  • 9 months ago

    I think you need to study these things in order to understand how the world of modeling and the world of acting operate. Young, inexperienced people run the risk of being defrauded by con artists who promise much and deliver little. Talent agencies have a bad reputation for this.

    Winning beauty contests is a great way to break into modeling. If you win Miss Teen Mississippi or something like that, the agencies will come to you. It's great to have a portfolio, but don't spend a lot of money on it. A few head shots and a few full body shots should be enough.

    Acting requires skill and practice. Take drama classes, join a drama club, work for free for amateur filmmakers, and join the Screen Actors Guild. Volunteer at local film festivals - they're a great way to make connections.

    The world of acting is extremely competitive, and most actors are out of work 90% of the time. Unless they have family money to rely on, actors must work in between gigs. Keep your expectations realistic.

    • Tina
      Lv 7
      9 months agoReport

      Unless things are very different in the US the winner of a beauty competition is likely to be too short and no way slender enough for a model (glamour modelling is something else). When I worked with a group of models it was like being in a bevy of very beautiufl giraffes.

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  • Cogito
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    As Katrina and Anonymous have said, modelling has nothing to do with acting.

    They're totally different, separate careers. Modelling is no more like acting than carpentry is.

    Any agency which claims to represent both is very likely to be a scam.

    The sort of person who has what it takes to be an actor is very rarely the sort who wants to be a model!

    Modelling is all about looks - no talent, intelligence, imagination, training, experience, or education is required.

    Acting is all about talent, intelligence, education and imagination – actors have very little interest in fashion and all that pointless stuff - and they have to get years of training and experience before anything will happen.

    And as they're totally difference careers, you're going to have to choose what sort of person you are.

    • Tina
      Lv 7
      9 months agoReport

      There is nothing pointless about nice clothes.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    Modeling and acting are two separate fields. They work differently, they have different agent and agencies, different clients, the looks and skill sets (and training) required are different... So they should also be treated as separate. But for both you don't "get chosen" like it's a reality show or something. Both are a BUSINESS. It's not about you, it's about investing and making money. No one's in this to make your dreams come true. Understand that.

    I'll start with modeling, since it's less complex. The way it works is you first make sure you have the right measurements to be a model in one of the departments. Make sure the (modeling) agency you're looking into is a legit one, then look at their website or call and ask for the requirements. If you have the right measurements, you send over a few pictures (not a resume! Models don't use a resume, they use a portfolio or a "book"!), again based on their requirements. If they're interested, they will meet with you in person and maybe sign you. In order to meet in person you obviously need to be there physically. Legit agencies are located in the big cities (like LA, NYC, Nashville, Miami, etc.). It's okay if you don't live close by when you take the meeting, BUT they will not sign you if you can't be where all the jobs are. Agencies are located in the big cities because that's where work is, where their clients (advertisers, designers...) are. Sometimes you will be required to travel for photoshoots, but in general you need to be where the industry is located. If you can't make it to work or to a go-see in time, that means you can't get (hired and) paid which means the agent will lose money on you. If that's the case, they don't want you. Agents make money when their clients book a job. That's how they pay their rent.

    So to answer your question, you must (relocate and) live in one of the big cities, where your agency is located. It wouldn't make sense otherwise. Theoretically, as there are no guarantees, If you do well as a model, you will get better and bigger jobs. That's the order of things.

    As for acting, it wouldn't make sense either, for the same reason. The entire industry is in LA, with NYC close behind and more for theater work. Other big cities have their own industry, mostly for local stuff. If you're interested in local stuff or things that don't require an agent, like theater, that's not a problem. If, however, you're interested in national movies, TV shows, commercials, etc., you have to be where work is. Simple. But can't just sign with a (talent) agency. They don't take on amateurs or beginners, only highly-trained and highly-experienced people. Productions invest TONS of money and they need to know it's in the hands of people who know what they're doing. Agents wouldn't risk their own reputation with casting directors. Since you're asking that question it's obvious that you don't have the training and (at least enough) experience. They teach you that sort of stuff in top-quality acting schools (also located in the big cities). Which is what legit (talent) agents require as your training, among other forms of training, in addition to low-level experience such as student and indie films and theater, in leading roles, as well as awards for your acting, as well as (training for) special skills such as signing and dancing, dialects, horseback riding, acrobatics, martial arts, etc.

    In other words, you first need to build a resume strong enough to impress potential agents, not just a "resume." In addition to all of that, you need to network and make connections. That's how you get an agent in the first place. Other ways, like cold querying with your headshots and resume or getting spotted at a showcase, rarely work. At some point someone you've worked with and impressed (like a director, a producer, an acting teacher or even a fellow actor) might be willing to refer you to an agent. I doubt you will be able to make the connections if you're not where the industry is. That's where your connections live and work after all. While you don't need to be there while you work on your resume, once you've got a strong one you WILL have to relocate to (the very expensive) LA or NYC and continue getting more experience and training there (and work at your day job at the same time) until someone will be willing to refer you to an agent. IF an agent signs you, you will be able to start going to auditions for professional work (the way Katrina explained), when and if it there are any for you. Theoretically, as there are no guarantees, If you do well as an actor, you will get better and bigger roles. That's the order of things, in short.

    Needless to say I hope, if you don't have what it takes (like the talent, the looks, thick skin, determination, passion for the craft, maturity physical and mental health, money...) don't bother. They're both very difficult jobs just to try and get into, and like I said there's no guarantee anything will come out of it.

    What I strongly suggest is that first, before you invest a lot of money, time, and work and make big sacrifices in your life, you find out if it's even worth it. Learn about the realities of each job and its business. Do your research. Give yourself a reality check. See what pursuing a professional career actually entails. Learn how to recognize scams. The reality is VERY different from what people imagine and you might be more interested in a fantasy of what you THINK it's like. There's also so much more to it than most people assume.

    Aside from research, if you're interested in acting and you've never tried real acting before, get into some local acting classes, something low-key just to get a sense of it. Find out what acting really is. See if you're even good at it. See if you enjoy the process. See if you can commit to many years of it. If you find that you are good at it and it is for you, apply to a good acting school (where well-known and respected acting teachers teach and successful actors graduated from) and start working on that resume. Considering agencies and relocating, even fantasizing about it, is pointless for now.

    Good luck!

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  • 9 months ago

    That’s not how it works. First, acting and modeling are two different things. And you don’t work for the modeling or acting agency. The agency represents you to various companies who make the decision whether or not to hire you (and where you go).

    So for acting, a company hires a casting director (CD) to find qualified actors to audition. The CD gives info to an agent about roles they want to cast (called a breakdown). The agent then submits actors for the roles. To submit means to send in the actors head shot and resume listing the actor’s training, experience, special skills and links to a show reel demonstrating their previous work. It the CD is interested the agent arranged an audition for the actor. If they decide to cast the actor, the agent negotiates the contract. For that work an agent is paid 10-20% of what the actor makes. NEVER pay an agent up front. It's similar for modeling. You're not hired by a modeling agency, they don't pay you - they represent you to companies looking for models.

    So a local agent will submit you for local jobs since that is where the agent's contacts are and so you can actually go to auditions. If you live in a smaller market it's very unlikely that if an agent submitted you for work in say LA that you would get invited to audition. There are agencies in the larger markets who are submitting their actor and their agents know the casting directors and they live where they can show up for an audition. But if you do well in a small, local market you can build your resume and marketing materials and investigate getting an agent in a larger market and move there.

    So it's NOT that you just get an agent and they take care of everything. If you want to work professionally (and you only need an agent if you want to try to work professionally) then you need to be in charge of your career. You need to understand the business end of things including contracts, unions, marketing and networking. You need to be willing to be in charge of your career.

    There are ALOT of scams and rip offs that prey on people who don't understand this and have some fantasy about being "discovered". Places laces like John Casablancas or Barbazon that imply that they're modeling/acting agencies and will get you work when really they make money by convincing you to take their classes. Talent "management" companies that charge you big bucks to be listed on their website that is rarely used by real casting directors. Shopping mall contests that make big promises but are just really marketing ploys to get kids to spend money.

    Again, you never pay a legitimate agent up front. Agencies work on commission (getting a percentage of what the actor/model makes). That doesn't mean you don't have to invest money in your career - you do. But you have to understand the industry enough to make good decisions on how to invest your money.

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    depends on the place, theyre all different

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