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Josie asked in Pregnancy & ParentingAdoption · 9 months ago

1. Identify the relevant professional values and ethics, your own relevant values, and any societal?

At one time, the biological and adoptive parents of adoptees were assured that private information would remain confidential and would never be shared with the adoptee. Presently, the right of adopted persons to information about their biological parents is becoming recognized in more and more jurisdictions. At one time, the biological and adoptive parents were assured that such information would remain confidential and would never be shared with the adoptee. Since court decision and legislative enactments in some states now guarantee the right of adopted persons to this information, social workers in these jurisdictions may have little choice but to reveal this information, even though they had earlier, in good faith, assured both biological and adoptive parents that this information would remain confidential. Is it ethical for social workers in states that have not yet passed legislation to continue to tell biological and adoptive parents that this information will always remain confidential?

Update:

5. Which alternative actions will be most efficient, effective, and ethical, as well as result in your

doing the least harm possible?

6. Have you considered and weighed both short- and long-term ethical consequences?

7. Final check: Is the planned action impartial, generalizable, and justifiable?

5 Answers

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  • 9 months ago
    Favourite answer

    An important thing to remember is that up until the past few decades, parents placing children were not given a choice about having an open or closed adoption - adoptions were closed, and there was no discussion about it. In the case of my original mom, although she voluntarily chose adoption for me, the hospital tried to deny her the chance to see me before she made the decision (thinking she wouldn't get attached if she didn't see me), but she refused to leave the hospital until she did, and she hoped every day from the day I was born until the day I found her that I would make contact again.

    In many cases from the 1960s and earlier, women did not place their children voluntarily as my original mom did, but were coerced into placing their children for adoption - women who would have given birth and raised their children, but their parents, boyfriends, or others pressured them to sign away their parental rights.

    Going forward, no person placing her child for adoption today should have any reasonable expectation that her child will never want to have contact, and the social workers need to make that clear.

    Source(s): Adoptee and Adoptive Mom.
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  • 8 months ago

    The "privacy" laws that govern adoptions are outdated and irrelevant. My half sister is 71 years old. Through commercial DNA services, she was able to determine the identity of both of her parents (both now deceased) and make contact with all her half siblings on both sides. Yet by law in the state where she was born, she isn't allowed to see her own birth certificate because her parents (who would be in their late 90s if they were still living) aren't alive to give permission. Ridiculous.

    Tell the parents the truth. If that child wants to find them. he or she will almost certainly be able to, law or no law.

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  • 9 months ago

    "The law currently is...." Problem solved.

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  • Kelly
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    Ethically, they should be informing adoptive parents and biological parents that the laws may change in the future and the information could be come available at some point in the future.

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  • 9 months ago

    No it is not. they should tell both that court decisions in this jurisdiction says that it is allowed if the person wants to know.

    This way the parents or adoptive parents can make an informed decision as to whether they still want to go through with the adoption

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