Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Social SciencePsychology · 6 months ago

Is this really hoarding?

I learnt hoarding can also develop due to traumatic past. I grew up in an abusive environment, and even after my parents separated, I had few issues, such as oblivious of my surroundings, social anxiety, uncontrollable anger, and messy room. On top of that, I had a few childhood items I didn't throw away until recently; e.g. a money-box I kept for 15 years.

I'm 22 now, and threw away every item from my childhood (useless stuff such as a thread or even an old computer mouse I bizarrely didn't want to throw away.) My current philosophy is: something not used for two years, discard. Does that make me a hoarder?

Or is this new drive for cleanliness another form of coping mechanism? According to my therapist, I know exactly all that's wrong with me and I don't need psychiatric treatment, and yet I didn't realise how I was hoarding...?...

Can anyone guide me kindly.

4 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    You're missing one aspect of objects that is maybe important; objects acquire sentimental value sometimes. Sometimes an object which no longer has use value, still is something you want to keep around, because it connects you to a certain part of your past. In the end, objects, are extensions of ourselves, we use them to do activities. You can go overboard with that (for example, keeping stuff that has become dusty and repulsively worn out), but, if an object is no longer useful but it still gives you some good vibe, why not keeping it around as a souvenir? I don't see the problem.

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  • 6 months ago

    No it is not hoarding.Hoarding is when you pick up things and kept them.

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    it might be hoarding if you dont need the stuff and still keep it

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  • 6 months ago

    You are a hoarder if your room or home is 1) too full of things, and you refuse to part with the reasonable things others toss, 2) you keep too many odd things, like cardboard boxes or bags of leaves or old papers, or 3) the amount of things you own makes you feel anxious or depressed or overwhelmed. If you are uncertain, ask a friend or an acquaintance who will tell you the truth.

    Source(s): 20 years experience as a School Psychologist
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