Which way do Saturn's rings rotate or do they just stay still?

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  • Tom S
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Yes each little "piece" is in its own orbit, and going in the same direction as Saturn's rotation.

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  • 6 months ago

    Saturn's rings consist of billions of tiny bits up to large boulders which orbit Saturn. They move in the same direction as it's largest moons, toward the East.

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  • Vaman
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    They are like tiny satellites. They have to rotate. They will most likely rotate in the same direction as Saturn.

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  • 6 months ago

    Te rings are composed of small particles. Each follows it's own orbit around Saturn. Hence the rings as a whole rotate. The inner parts rotate faster than the outer parts, which is expected from principles of celestial mechanics.

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  • Sharon
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    standing still is physically impossible, as they would collapse into the planet. All planetary rings (i.e. Jupiter's, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) all orbit their respective planets in the direction of counterclockwise as viewed looking down from above the planet's north pole. Each of the rings consists of billions of tiny particles

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  • 6 months ago

    They orbit in the same direction as Saturn's Spin

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  • 6 months ago

    From West to East (local reference).

    Also called "prograde" (fancy word to mean "the normal way things orbit, within the Solar system").

    If you were to rise above the North pole, almost everything would seem to rotate (and orbit) in a counter-clockwise direction (as if you were turning a steering wheel to the left).

    Saturn rotates that way.

    Its major satellites orbit in that direction.

    The rings (or, rather, each all the tiny rocks that makes up the rings) orbit Saturn in that direction.

    Saturn orbits the Sun in that direction (so do all the major planets)

    The Sun rotates in that direction

    and so on (at least, within the Solar system).

    There are 29 (or so) satellites that orbit Saturn in retrograde direction (the "wrong" way). They are mostly tiny things that have been captured (they used to be asteroids or pieces of comet before they were captured by Saturn). They are called the "Norse group".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saturn%27s_Norse_gro...

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  • 6 months ago

    If they "stayed still", they would fall directly toward Saturn. They have to be in motion to keep from falling. The particles (or whatever term you want to call individual chunks of matter) are mostly all rotating in the same direction as the moons. The rings themselves, well, they are not units, but the general "flow" of the mass of materials is the same as the other satellites. The ring particles are satellites in a way.

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  • 6 months ago

    The rings of Saturn are made of an uncountable number of particles which widely vary in size. These particles are orbiting the planet, therefore Saturn's rings do rotate around it.

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  • 6 months ago

    If you were to position yourself above Saturn's north polar axis, everything spins in a counterclockwise rotation including its moon orbits.

    The very same is true with each of the planets and including the sun and the planet orbits in the solar system.

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