What is your favorite book about World War 2 and why?

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    "Operation Mincemeat" and "Agent Zigzag" by Ben MacIntyre. I saw the movie "The Man Who Never Was" when I was young, and was enthralled by the story of the British Secret Services using a dead man to put false information to the Abwehr. "Zigzag" was a confidence man and petty criminal who got caught when the Germans invaded the Channel Islands and the jail he was in. He volunteered to spy on the British. He won over the Abwehr, who trained him and sent him to England as a saboteur. Zigzag immediately turned himself in and, after convincing MI5, became a double agent.

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  • 5 months ago

    Catch-22, by Joseph Heller [Europe; Mediterranean]; The Cruel Sea, by Nicholas Monserrat [the Atlantic convoys]; A Town Like Alice, by Nevil Shute [the war in the Far East, specifically Malaysia]; Night Falls on the City, by Sarah Gainham [Vienna under German occupation]; Alone in Berlin, by Hans Fallada [war-time Berlin].

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Riggs, "Hitler's Jewish Soldiers" because it shows how complicated the Third Reich actually was instead of dumbing it down and simplifying it for stunted intellects. Simple solutions for simple minds.

    Source(s): Bryan Riggs, "Hitler's Jewish Soldiers". And some close seconds: "The Hidden Hitler" by Lothar Mactan. "Hitler's Spy Princess" by Martha Schad. "IBM and the Holocaust" . . .
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  • Spike
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Operation Mincemeat: Operation Mincemeat: How a Dead Man and a Bizarre Plan Fooled the Nazis and Assured an Allied Victor by Ben Macintyre

    A great WWII Naval Intelligence operation that was well planed by Ewen Montagu. I like the movie The Man Who Never Was, that based on the book of the same name by Ewen Montagu. It really did fool the German where the next stage of the Allies would be. I'm not really that into WWII spy stuff. I like the real spy world but more of the Cold War up to today and beyond. But that book was really good.

    • Killmouseky
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      The effects of "Mincemeat" are exaggerated to the point of hilarity in U.K. propaganda, like many other things. This book is almost as laughable as "A Man Called Intrepid." If the U.K. was so great, & the Nazis so inept, how come it took 5 yrs., 8 months to win the war with all their help? .

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    the velveteen rabbit

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      I'm sure it must be Judith Kerr's "When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit". An understandable mistake, but a mistake all the same.

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  • 5 months ago

    I loved Slaughterhouse-Five.

    But my favorite is Neal Stephenson's Cryptonomicon, which uses multiple points of view, including some from Japanese soldiers, and bounces between the descendants of the main characters in the present day and their forebears' actions during the war. It's a massive book, but you're still sorry it's over when you reach the end.

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  • 5 months ago

    If you mean fiction, then The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat.

    If you mean a memoir from someone involved, then The Eighth Passenger by Miles Tripp.

    If you mean a work by a later historian, then Stalingrad by Anthony Beevor.

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  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Wheels of Terror....Sven Hassel.

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  • 5 months ago

    The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William Shirer. I like it because Shirer was there-at least for the rise. After the Americans were kicked out of Germany he spent the rest of the war in London. There is just no way a dispassionate historian could write the same book. Another reason I like it is because it turned Shirer's life around when he was down and out due to the Red Scare.

  • Benny
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Slaughterhouse Five. Moving, funny, and easy to read.

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    • Benny
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Also, The Book Thief is a very moving young-adult novel that's suitable for all ages. And The Diary of Anne Frank is a must.

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