y asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 6 months ago

I am Japanese and would like to know the subtle difference in English.?

Update:

I'm sorry. I couldn't add my question.

Is it possible to use both A and B?

A. I won't be able to either post anything or talk to anyone on my facebook for the time being.

B. I will be able to neither post anything nor talk to anyone on my facebook for the time being

7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    both can be used but they aren't the sentences an English speaker would always use but for a non English speaker it would be fine, to make it better you could say: I can't/cannot post nor talk to anyone on Facebook for the time being.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Don't make a double negative!

    Negate the verb.

    I can do

    I can't do

    I am able

    I'm not able

    If you use a double negative it changes the meaning of the sentence.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    In that case, "either" and "neither" are not necessary. If you have any other questions, or need help writing English, please feel free to ask.

    http://tiolibooks.com/blank_1.html

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    "Either/or: and "neither/nor" are unnecessary in those sentences. Native English speakers would say "I am unable to post anything or talk to anyone on Facebook for the time being." If you insist on using them (not recommended) "either" and "neither" go before the infinitive (search "split infinitive"): "I am unable either to post...." "I am able neither to post ...."

    "For the time being" refers to now, so it takes the present tense.

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  • Bob
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    やはり、日本語と英語の微妙な違いは微妙ですね。

    Here's one subtle difference...

    Japanese and English often use Go and Come differently.

    eg: A Japanese person would say "I'll go to your house at 5pm". An English speaker would say, "I'll come to your house at 5pm"

    A Japanese woman will exclaim, "I'm going!"

    An English speaking woman will moan, "I'm coming!"

    • y6 months agoReport

      That's a typical difference between the European language and Japanese. But in some dialects spoken in Kyushu, they do say like "I'm coming to you".

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  • 6 months ago

    The difference between what?

    Tell me what you do not understand, and I will try to help.

    I studied speaking Japanese for 3 years, never became fluent because I never went to Japan. I hope to change that one day and pick it up again.

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    The subtle difference between WHAT?

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