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Anonymous

Quitting a job when you like your boss?

I have decided to leave my job as I feel it is not a good fit for me. My boss is great and has always treated me well and I’m really nervous to tell her because I’m pretty sure she isn’t going to expect this from me. She also has alot going on in her personal life around the time that I am leaving and I’m worried that I will be leaving her short handed and it will effect her plans. I want to give a 3 weeks notice so she hopefully has time to find a replacement but everytime I plan to put my notice in I end up chickening out. Everyone close to me knows how unhappy I’ve been at this job and they tell me I need to do what’s best for me and leave but I can’t help but feel bad leaving at this time and almost feel like I should stay longer even though I really don’t want to. Side note: I do have another job lined up but it is working for my mom so I don’t have an official day I need to start. Any advice?

10 Answers

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  • GEEGEE
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    If your boss has been a supervisor for any amount of time, she is accustomed to seeing people come and go. She may be disappointed to see you go. If you are very unhappy she might sense this, and may not be as surprised as you think she will be. Give her the three weeks notice and ideally she will find someone to replace you within that time frame.

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    The last job I quit was like that. I even considered my boss as a mentor, he taught me a lot about my trade. As good as he was at that, there were aspects to running the business that he was neglecting. One of the people working there was a loud, unprofessional drug addict the boss was trying to help. Boss and I were the only people doing what we do at the business, I worried what he would do if I left.

    I finally secured another job and gave my notice. This wasn't his first rodeo. He had run businesses for a long time, and he accepted my resignation. Obviously, *I* wasn't the first person who had ever given notice to him. Managers have to accept that some good employees are going to move on.

    Although the moment I gave my notice the boss was really professional, he did surprise me a couple days later by saying he didn't think my new employer would be able to give me full-time hours.(None of his business, really) He was wrong about that. I only mention it because it IS a possibility that your boss could do something like that. It's a tad unprofessional, but it happens.

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  • 9 months ago

    Fffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff

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  • Anonymous
    9 months ago

    "...I’m really nervous to tell her because I’m pretty sure she isn’t going to expect this from me....Everyone close to me knows how unhappy I’ve been at this job..."

    Your boss most likely already knows how unhappy you are too. If you confided in your coworkers about the issue it's likely one of them let the cat outta the bag in casual or maybe even intentionally malicious conversation with your boss. Unfortunately, the workplace is a competitive environment and there's always some dirtbag out there who will throw you under the bus.

    Also, when people are unhappy with their jobs, it tends to show. Their job performance suffers because they don't really care. I suppose that's why they call it work. The hardest part is trying to force yourself to care about something you have no interest in at all.

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  • Judy
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    just tell her......................

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  • 9 months ago

    Hey boss, I am moving on to another job. I enjoyed my time here and appreciate your mentorship...

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  • Sam
    Lv 7
    9 months ago

    No problem, be professional and give them your final day or work. Also put it in email after you meet first to give the date, and tell her you will email so its also in writing (always make sure its in writing so the date is set). Dont feel bad, you have to do what is best for you, not others. If they were laying off workers then wouldn't think twice about laying you off, so you have to be ok with moving on to a different job. She will understand, thats life.

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  • Don't worry about your current job, they will find some one to replace you

    Don't let her make you feel guilty about quitting. If you don't want to work there any more then give your notice with a resignation letter. You don't have to tell them why you're leaving.

    Thank her for giving you the opportunity to work for you. Unfortunately you have to move on from ____ . You will be resigning as of _____ date.

    Your signature

    Your name.

    I've quit jobs with managers that were nice to me as well. They never told me about their personal lives, I don't have to know about that.

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  • 9 months ago

    First tell her that ... She is great and has always treated me well

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  • Mark
    Lv 5
    9 months ago

    My suggestion is to ask to speak to your boss, privately and tell her your concerns. Own it, without placing blame on anyone - e.g. I feel (stressed out, frustrated) when X happens, or Y and I'm not able to reach my full potential because of this.

    Stating that you're unhappy without good cause, makes it look like the problem is with you, rather than your environment. Try not to prejudge or pre-empt her response in any way. Stay open. For all you know, she may be aware of rumblings from within, but not been able to effect change, yet. Or she may question if you are better off in another area of the business.

    In other words, avoid coming across as a victim.

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