what is the meaning of "for going on * years"?

I read a sentence such as " we've collecting materials for going on seventy years now "

But, I couldn't get the meaning because I thought that it would go well without the "going on", and just "seventy years now"

What does the additional "going on" make a difference to the meaning of the sentence?

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  • 6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    It may indicate an ongoing process and one which is imprecise. The speaker may be estimating the "70 years" part, when it is perhaps just 68 or 69 years, and even 74 years. I would likely use the phrase to explicitly refer to an event that has happened for >69 years but not quite 70 years. In my mind I would say it in the months preceding the actual 70th anniversary. Not every event needs such precision, nor does every speaker use that amount of precision. You might see it in marketing literature where the ad may run in a yearly publication like a phone book and the reader will see the ad when it's closer to the * being true, or it is read later.

    Similarly, "we are going on our third year together as a couple" might be spoken in the 34th month... maybe the 43rd month. It's vague.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    It makes sense as a sentence but it is inaccurate. Maybe it has been only 67 years.

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    This sentence wrongly omits "been" after "we've". The expression "going on" means almost or nearly.

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  • 6 months ago

    approximately, almost, near to, about, approaching

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  • 6 months ago

    For going on... it's a fancy way of saying for almost * amount of years.

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