Do women stop producing estrogen entirely during menopause or do the ovaries just decline in production?

I am asking due to a loved one that will be undergoing a hysterectomy with possible ovary removal. She's 50 yrs old and is currently in premenopause I believe; hasn't has a period in about 3 months so I suspect her estrogen is currently declining. What worries me is after the surgery she'll experience an estrogen shock, complete lackof, when that would've never happened witnout the surgery. Insight please

Update:

also, pls tell elaborate on any existing connection with the hysterectomy/removing ovaries and cancer/heart disease/osteoporosis?

7 Answers

Relevance
  • Edna
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If a woman's ovaries are removed by surgery, they can never again produce estrogen, and she'll need to take some type of estrogen replacement therapy. If her ovaries are intact and she just goes through natural menopause, then her ovaries will continue to produce estrogen, but in a smaller amount than before.

    A hysterectomy does NOT mean that the ovaries will be removed. Often, all that is removed is the uterus; and a uterus has no effect upon the production of estrogen.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    "Estrace" is used as hormone replacement therapy, for those women who have lost their Uterus, tubes and ovaries through a "total hysterectomy." Her Doctor should be ready and able to help her make the transition from hormones, or lack of hormones, to taking the hormone replacement. 50 years old is just too young to lose these ovaries.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    A person is passed on to an endocrinologist after that surgery to monitor hormone levels.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • Pippin
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Estrogen production declines gradually.

    Depending on why she is having her uterus removed, she may or may not be able to keep one or both ovaries. This would be something she would discuss with her doctor, along with the pros and cons of hormone replacement therapy, whether long or short term.

    If the doctor believes that removing her ovaries is necessary, it's because she has determined that the risks associated with NOT removing them are higher than the increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

    (I had a hysterectomy and asked to keep my ovaries. One did have to be removed, but I still have the other.)

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • What do you think of the answers? You can sign in to give your opinion on the answer.
  • 6 months ago

    I never had a hysterectomy and i have zero estrogen left in my body, so i either have to live with it, or take some sort of hormone replacement.

    Your friend isn't the only one on earth who is going to go through this or who has gone through it already. We have all lived to tell about it.

    Your friend can talk to her doctor about hormone replacement if she's interested. Some people are, others not so much. It's her choice and decision.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Nope................................. early.

    • Log in to reply to the answers
  • 6 months ago

    Although less common an operation than it used to be, hysterectomy is still quite frequently still carried out. Along with the uterus go the fallopian tubes and the ovaries. But so many women over the years have undergone surgery and if it was inadvisable it wouldn't be done. Of course the body does change with the decline in estrogen production, and if this has been declining slowly anyway, its ceasing will still take time to take effect and the body will not suffer what you describe as 'estrogen shock'.

    • do women eventually stop producing estrogen altogether?

    • Log in to reply to the answers
Still have questions? Get answers by asking now.