Dropping out of graduate school?

It's so hard to figure out what I want to do with my life. I changed my major so many times as an undergraduate and finally graduated with an English degree with plans to study Elementary education on a graduate level. I have now finished one year (two semesters) of grad school. However, I have extreme doubts about it.

To start, I have a social anxiety disorder, which makes it difficult to feel comfortable in front of the classroom. While speaking to a bunch of second graders isn't too difficult, the fact that my mentor teacher and support staff were watching really exacerbated my anxiety. Forming a relationship with my mentor teacher was hard too since I found myself nervous to talk to her. I really tried and made an effort, but it was mentally and physically exhausting. I'm genuinely concerned for my wellbeing and can't imagine how I will be able to keep this up for the second half of graduate school, as well as in my future career as a teacher.

The idea of student teaching in the Spring is causing me to lose sleep. I wake up in the middle of the night feeling like I can't breathe after having nightmares about student teaching. I think I need to drop out, but I'm worried about the stigma of being a "quitter." My parents will be really disappointed too. As much as I like the IDEA of being a teacher, I really don't think I'm well-suited for the job. Pushing through the last year doesn't seem worth it.

So, my question is: How dumb is it to drop out of graduate school?

6 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    A comfortable future does not come easy. Understand?

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  • 5 months ago

    You have made a large investment to get to this point - time and money. Presuming you are certified to teach now, you could go ahead and teach - then go back to pick up your master's later. Many teachers do this for the pay increase. You would also find out if teaching is what you really want to do.

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  • 5 months ago

    If you have actually been diagnosed with social anxiety, are you getting any help for it? Medication? Counseling? It's very common to be nervous about teaching. The point of student teaching is to give you practice so that you're not as nervous when you get a classroom of your own. Having your own students is quite different from what you've experienced- you get to know them and they get to know you. A good student teaching experience has you observing the teacher first, then taking over for short periods of time, gradually doing more and more with students you've come to know. If that's now how it works where you'll be teaching, you need to know that.

    P.S. I fainted on my first day of teaching. But it's a job I've loved for many years now.

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  • 5 months ago

    Take a year or two/three off. Find any job to put a roof over your head and food on the table, and take it from there. Like the job......stay some time. Doný like the job - get out within three months. By age thirty you'll have tons of experience and can do umpteen types of jobs and will most likely be in one that you like. I did and all three of my kids did.

    Peace.

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  • audrey
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    If you think you'll never have to do anything in life that makes you uncomfortable, lots of luck.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Live homeless on the streets for a year. That'll give you some perspective.

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