Public speaking - Must I memorize my speech , or is it ok to read from my notes?

Tomorrow is my brother's funeral. I will speak at his memorial service. I have never spoke publicly before.

Can I glance down at my notes which I have written on paper? Or must I make eye contact with the funeral goers?

14 Answers

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Yes, since you clarified "glancing". People get turned off/sleepy when people READ something (as in "look down constantly at a sheet of paper and kind of drone").

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  • Benny
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    In this situation, whatever you do is okay. I'm sorry for your loss.

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  • 6 months ago

    In general I would say it's a bad idea to simply read your speech aloud. But this is a specific kind of occasion where nobody is there to judge your speech-making skills, as they would at a business conference; this is a funeral, and nobody will care. They just want to hear what you have to say about your brother. If it's easier for you to write the eulogy then read it out, that's fine. But don't forget to look at the congregation before you start, and after you finish: they will appreciate it.

    For a different occasion, where things are less emotional, the best thing is to know what you want to say and note down bullet points. This way you can glance at your notes when you need to, and look at the audience most of the time.

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  • Edna
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Most people, when they're speaking in public (at a funeral or any other place), jot down the high point that they want to make during their speech, and refer to their notes from time to time while they're speaking.

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  • y
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    You can read from your note but the more your speech is memorized, the easier it will be. If you have no issue speaking in front of a crowed, then either way shouldn't be an issue. But if you do have issues speaking in public, or haveing the focus on yourself, the better prepared you are, the easier it will go.

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    i think you can read from your notes

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  • 6 months ago

    Read through your speech a couple of times beforehand. Try to read it out loud at least once. Go away from other people while you do this. When it is your turn, put your notes on the lectern, look at someone and deliver the opening line straight to them. You can then read your speech but as you know much of it, you can look up now and then and when you do, look straight at someone and say the words to them. Pick people you know well or complete strangers, it doesn't matter. When you look at one person in the group, everyone gets the sense that you are looking at them.

    Take your time. If you get emotional, pause, take a deep breath and try to carry on. Remember your brother has died. You knew him as no-one else did. Your speech will carry that sense of your relationship with him that is special to you. People will listen and appreciate what you are saying even if you read the entire speech without looking up but looking up occasionally and telling them directly will give your message clearly.

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  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    It's perfectly acceptable to use notes...although just reading them out is not on.

    Use them to remind you if you forget what you are trying to say.

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  • 6 months ago

    Nobody will dis you for reading a eulogy. If that's the best you can do at this time then it's all good.

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  • Rick B
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Personally, I would not write a speech, I would simply have bullet points that I wanted to address and I would talk about each one. Of course it is acceptable to look at your notes when giving a eulogy.

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