Have you used the tankless electric water heater, does it give enough hot water for appliances, (2) bathrooms? Appreciate answers. Thanks?

Update:

Thanks to each and everyone of you on your excellent advice. I have racked my brain in trying to find a way to be able to handle a hot water tank as mentioned.presently have city water which is yuk, and afraid it could eventually harm my appliances that handle water. I thought with this, perhaps I could have a water softener system put in.

God Bless each and everyone of you, and please have a wonderful week.

11 Answers

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  • 4 months ago

    If you get a big enough tankless electric water heater it will generate enough water to take a shower and do your laundry and do the dishes and only take a few minutes to recover. If you get one too small you'll never have enough hot water it's best to get one bigger than what you think you need. Tankless water heaters are not wasteful the coils only come on when you start using water it's better to have a bigger unit than what you actually need it will shut off as soon as you stop using the water.

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  • 5 months ago

    tankless-use less space, heat only water that you use and not a 40 or 60 gal tank. using one now 30 years...no probs.

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  • 5 months ago

    Tankless water heaters are sized for the # of gallons per minute needed. It isn't uncommon to use separate smaller units for appliances instead of a single whole house unit.

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  • 5 months ago

    It will if it is sized for the load expected. Mine is actually a bit oversized and I have all the ******* hot water I want.

    • I care
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Thanks, if after research I decide to purchase one, I appreciate your input about oversizing...

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  • 5 months ago

    I haven't consistently used them, but have installed electrical power to a few, many people underestimate the size needed.

    Whether it will work depends on the power rating of the heater, the maximum gpm's that will be drawn by your taps, and the desired heat rise.

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  • Edwena
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    We have one that uses propane. It is sized for 2 bathrooms, has a rating of about 8 gpm. We use it for some outdoor bath/tub facilities. It performs better than expected, certainly producing more than an adequate supply of hot water. We think the throttle in the water supply is the size and distance of the pipe, not the heater, but the throughput is more than sufficient for 2 concurrent demands. The hot water is delivered much quicker than you would guess, and it is continuous. Overall, probably superior to a tank. Except it is a much more complicated device that will eventually need maintenance. The worse thing about a tankless water heater is installation because of all of the incoming service lines into it and the space required. This propane heater requires domestic water in, propane in, thermostat control out, electrical in, cold water out, hot water out, relief vent out, so it is a big job putting one of these things in. Just about as big as doing a house. The power requirement for an electric would probably require rewiring a separate circuit from the meter (a 2nd meter). 2nd from largest Rheem. Note. The tank is on an outdoor wall and uses about 8' x 4' because of the service lines. The unit is only about 2 x 1.5 x 1. Getting service to it requires design at a professional level.

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  • elhigh
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    That depends on the tankless model you choose.

    There are tankless electric heaters that are capable of running all the things you describe, simultaneously. They will, at full load, pull more power than the entire rest of your house.

    Literally.

    A tankless heater often requires a significant upgrade to the distribution panel at the very least, as it can draw heavy amps - equivalent to an electric stove, electric clothes dryer and central air conditioning COMBINED at full load, and the wiring and supply installed have to be sized to handle the full load. So in addition to the price of the tankless heater, you also have to factor in the costs of upgrading the power supplies for it.

    Tankless electric heaters have regular, non-optional maintenance requirements. You MUST turn it off and de-lime its heating elements on a regular basis, or it will die an early death.

    Tankless heaters do not eliminate the wait for hot water at distant faucets. If that is a problem you're trying to solve, a central tankless unit is not the way to do it. A small point-of-use unit installed at the faucet, however, could be - and those don't have the huge power needs the central units do. Some can just plug in at the wall.

    For all the costs and hassles associated with tankless units, I don't recommend them. Here and there they have their merits but for the most part they aren't a good enough substitute to warrant the choice. Tank heaters are reliable and effective, and standby losses need not be great, especially if you install supplemental insulation to the tank and insulate the distribution lines.

    Good luck with it.

    • I care
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Appreciate all your input, I am in the market to research them since our city water is not great.
      Also space is a problem, and why I thought this would solve mine, plus getting a water softener.
      I will take in all you have shared and really check up on models around my area. THANKS.

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  • Droopy
    Lv 5
    5 months ago

    Depends on where your at ive looked at these in past an lot of it depends on water coming into house. Was told the line for fossil fuel vs electric is ruffly Va/NC state line. electric will work north of that you just might not get as hot as you want. Course this was 7 or 8 years ago im sure they have been improved seens. As far as suppling enough water you'll need to size it there not one size fits all.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    One of those questions that depends where you are. This is from the UK. If your mains supply is reliable you don't need a water tank. Many people prefer not to store water nowadays because of the (perceived) risk of Legionella. You would need to size it for delivering to two showers simultaneously (or filling two baths) but that shouldn't be too hard as modern regs limit the temperature at the point of delivery to avoid scalding. The downside is that if your water supply stops for some reason you won't have any water until its fixed.

    • I care
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Thanks UK...…...the water here is the issue..city....water is yuk and why I am researching about these small tankless due to lack of space in my present home. Plus we use water softeners also to help again due to water not up to par...…...only hope something can resolve the present issues.

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  • 5 months ago

    There are many types and powers of tankless electric water heater. Your needs depend on the usage rate of each bathroom at any one time.

    • I care
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Use basically only Master bathroom, for now, as my son has to be bathed since handicap.
      When family comes is only time guest bath is used. I have lots of research ahead of me it looks like.
      Thanks so much.

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