Can I redeem my coin money to my debit card/into cash without a fee if I do it at my own bank (Wells Fargo)?

I have a bucket of quarters, dimes, etc., that I've been saving up and if I use the coin machine at Walmart it charges me a fee of a dime per dollar. Can I do this without fee if I do it at my bank?

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    You need to check with your bank if they charge a fee to sort coins assuming they have a coin sorter for existing customers.

    You might want to go through the money and take out the quarters. You need a LOT of dimes, nickles and pennies to make up a lot of % and it might be worth it just to pay the fee. You may also find a coin machine that will not charge you a fee IF you take a gift card for Starbucks or another store that you use.

    I had a bunch of Canadian coins and found out that Coinstar up there doesn't offer the gift card option so we took out all the $1, $2 coins and quarters and then paid to sort the rest. Even if I had $20 in dimes and smaller (I don't think I had), it would cost me $2.

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  • Erik
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Most banks want you to roll them first. They will give you the wrappers for free, if you ask. There's no fee if you're customer.

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  • GEEGEE
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Many banks don't offer the coin counting machines, but sometimes smaller banks or credit unions do. Many perhaps most banks would require you to roll the coins yourself for deposit or bills. For me, the fee for the machine at Walmart is well worth my time if many coins are involved.

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  • 6 months ago

    Sounds like you will be paying many small bills at stores and fast-food places with coins for many years. You can also turn $2 or $3 worth of coin [maybe more] into dollars each time at the bank. I am not kidding. [note: your deposits of coin and cash go into your checking account and then you "get it out"/use it by using your debit card - which is like a permanent plastic check.]

    Source(s): In the old days ... so idk what Wells Fargo does now.
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  • 6 months ago

    If you do it at the bank, you have to have it pre-counted and rolled.

    • RICK
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      That depends on the bank
      Mine accepts both loose and rolled coins

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  • 6 months ago

    Wells Fargo got in trouble a few years ago...those machines were not accurate...so they removed them from every location I have seen.

    In general, most banks will accepts wrapped coins though. You have to do the work...or buy a machine that does it for you.

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  • 6 months ago

    Hello

    Call them.. Technology changed alot and made some people extremely lazy so what worked before may not work now..

    Best

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Call them first. Even my fairly small credit union has put in a coin counting machine (in the lobby). It will count up all of your coins and produce a receipt so that you can deposit it in your account.

    Sadly, even my credit union charge 10% to do that and will NOT accept rolled coins anymore.

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  • 6 months ago

    It depends on how your bank branch handles coins. Some expect you to bag them up in their plastic bags so they can count them by weighing them. If they do that, they may charge a fee. Some have a coin counting machine similar to the one in Walmart. It prints out a receipt which you take to the counter. If they work like that, they probably won't charge a fee.

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  • audrey
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Only if you get change wrappers and wrap it all first. Banks won't just take a bucketful of change. Just pay Coinstar the fee.

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