George
Lv 4
George asked in Science & MathematicsMathematics · 6 months ago

If something is 0.3 percent of the population, how does this work? Because zero has no value. Can someone explain?

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  • TomV
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    0.3% = 0.3/100 = 0.003

    Multiply the population by 0.003 to get the number of the "something". If the population is 5000, then 0.3% is 5000*0.003 = 15

    You comment "Because zero has no value" is confusing and suggests some misunderstanding somewhere. How does zero enter into the problem/question? If the population is zero, then it follows that 0.3% of zero is also zero.

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  • 6 months ago

    If something is 0.3 percent of the population,

    how does this work?

    Because zero has no value.

    Can someone explain?

    One-tenth of 3 percent is 0.3 percent.

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  • Sky
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If you're talking about the leading zero before the decimal point, that is only commonly put there to indicate there is no other value before the decimal. 0.3 and .3 are exactly the same value.

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  • Vaman
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If there is a decimal sign then 0 has a significance. ie. 1 in 100 is written as 0.01.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    0.3 is still larger than 0 so it has a value, ie 3/10 ths of one percent.

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  • 6 months ago

    0.3% is 3 parts out of 1000.

    3% is 3 parts out of 100

    0.03% is 3 parts out of 10000

    what does zero have to do with this?

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  • 6 months ago

    1% is 1/100, so 0.3% is 0.3/100. Multiply both halves by 10 to get 3/1000 (or 3 occurrences out of 1000, as mentioned).

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    That's like 3 out of 1000.

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