Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 5 months ago

Is it correct to say "Here probably arises a pertinent question as to why he would want to study mathematics now, if he didn't like it as a?

child?",

or "Here probably the pertinent question arises as to why he would want to study mathematics now, if he didn't like it as a child?',

or "Here probably the/a pertinent question arises, "Why would he want to study mathematics now, if he didn't like it as a child?".

Would it be proper for written American English?

1 Answer

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  • 5 months ago

    you may say either "a pertinent question" (suggesting that it is one of many pertinent questions that could be asked) or you may say "the pertinent question", indicating that there is only that one question which is truly pertinent. The "here, probably," part is more of a contextual phrase that is not required, and often might not belong (might not fit the situation) but could be said in certain discussions (referring to specific part of a larger discussion could make the "here" part make sense; otherwise the "Here" is a given).

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