Best options to add a bathroom to a house?

My grandparents live on an island in Washington state, and they have a house with another smaller "guest house" right next door. Although, I wouldn t exactly call it a guest house, considering it does not have running water or a bathroom area (no toilet, no shower/bath, no sink, etc).

I am going into my senior year of high school, and next summer I will be moving into their guest house for the first couple years of college. While I m super thankful that I have the privilege of a rent-free living situation, I am a little bummed about there being no bathroom. I have about $500 in my savings, currently, and I plan on getting to at least $1,000 by the time I move out there next summer.

I don t need a fancy bathroom situation, by any means. But what do y all think the estimated cost for running water, a toilet, a shower (or bathtub), and a sink would come down to? I tried googling it, but I didn t find any answers that were specific enough to my situation. Thanks so much! Sorry if I seem naïve by posting this, I m just trying to figure out the possibilities!

9 Answers

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  • drip
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    If the extra space does not have plumping already you are taking a boat load of money to put in a bathroom of any kind.

    Connecting pipes to the city’s sewer line and water is expensive. A licensed plumber needs do the work. Pipes must connect undergrad to the city’s pipes, then up through the floor and out of the wall to hook up to the sink, shower and toilet. Pricey😬

    This is why upgrading or adding a bathroom can add on a significant amount of money to a home’s value.

    You may want to look at option campers use

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Palm-Springs-5-Gallon-P...

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/SereneLife-SLCASN18-Por...

    For a hot shower you will need to go inside your grandparents house.

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  • 6 months ago

    There are variables to consider:

    Is the proposed bathroom area near the current water source (well) or the current sewage source (septic)? You say your grandparents live on an island, so I do not assume there is city water and city sewage, just private wells and septic systems.

    Once you can navigate those necessities, then you have to plan for hook ups to those utilities. Plus an electrician to install the electrical components needed for a water heater. A toilet, a shower, a sink and a water heater will cost about $1200. if you economize, then you have to add in the excavation work for the water inlet and sewage outlet hookups, plus the materials for the walls, a window, heater, insulation, sheetrock, outside siding, roofing. I really do not think even a handy man can do that whole job for under $5K. So, you can probably double that amount. Adding a bathroom is expensive.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    The biggest cost is actually going to be the drainage. If you can work out how to do that cheaply and legally you might be in a better position to judge. As your grandparents benefit from the upgrade maybe they could contribute towards it?

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  • Edwena
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    Talk to your grandparents about the problem and find out if they have a solution. It doesn't seem right to make this offer and not have a solution for the most basic. Like do you come in their house to bath, which bathroom? Unfortunately, putting in a bathroom is as much as the house. A major expense and major work. Cold water, hot water, sewer and probably electricity all have to be connected to existing facilities and brought inside. Then you need walls to put all of this in. That takes a space that is 8 feet x 8 feet to do what you want/need (commode, shower, sink, and water heater, in each quadrant). But anyway, you are looking at $10,000 to fix your place up, if you do most of the work. You would be better off on campus in a dorm. Decide soon, because you are looking at several months doing the work.

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  • 6 months ago

    Above all correct. Look into a camping toilet. Shower in the main house.

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  • 6 months ago

    If the "guest house" has no plumbing, first it will have to be plumbed into the septic tank which will require a permit and the septic system may not be approved for another bathroom. Second, you will have to trench a water supply line to the guest house, and tear out some interior walls and floors to accommodate a sink, shower and toilet plumbing. Third, you will have to modify the electrical panel to accommodate a water heater in your space. You are about $2K-3K short.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      There are many alternatives that do not require an electric water heater.

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  • 6 months ago

    The bathroom itself need not cost all that much, though you'd have to construct a small room and install the fixtures and that could easily be a few thousand dollars or more depending on who builds it. You might or might not need a permit for that.

    The expensive part is dealing with getting the running water to the bathroom and where the waste water from the bathroom goes. You'd have to run a water line from the main supply line. That means digging a trench at least 18" deep. The wastewater would have to go into a sewer system or a septic field. I don't know which one this property has. If it's a sewer system, you have to dig another trench to connect to that. If it's a septic field, you might have to install another septic field or expand the existing one, both of which are going to cost many thousands of dollars, if you can even get a permit to do it and if there's room on the lot to do it. Installing a septic field or hooking up to a municipal sewer system are not things you can just do because you want to. You need permission and must follow pretty strict rules. I can't see the cheapest option costing less than $5,000, added to the cost of the bathroom itself. The most expensive option could well be $25,000 or more.

    If you don't want to have to go out in the dark and the rain to use a bathroom at night, use a bucket and then empty that into the main house's toilet the next day. You know what a chamber pot is? That's what people used to use when houses didn't have indoor plumbing. That's what we used at our cottage when I was a kid and the outhouse was 200 feet away in the bush and no one wanted to go back there in the dark. They even make 'toilet seats' for 5 gallon buckets, for camping.

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  • 6 months ago

    You aer looking at thousands of dollars just for a toilet - you will need either dig a new septic or put in a mound system since it is illegal to have two separate houses drain into the same septic. You will also need to tap into the main water line or drill a new well (more thousands of dollars). Then there are the actual fiztures...small shower/tub $500 to 1,000. Sink with faucets $500, vanity with sink and fixtures, another %500 and the probably a few thousand for plumbers, etc (since you have to clear code).

    And all this assumes the land percs for a second septic and you can get the proper permits.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      6 months agoReport

      I know of many houses that share a common septic system. Not sure why you think that would be "illegal".

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    A $1000 won’t do it. To add even a shower toilet and sink would cost at least ten times that. You are talking about actually adding a room and plumbing would have to be installed. I’m referring to pipelines being run underground because there is not already an existing water source available.

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