Can I fit on a 20 inch bike?

I weigh 145 lbs and I recently got a bike with 20 inch rims to work on. It s a kids bike, but I m planning on making it a low rider to use during football season to ride around in for fun (SKOL). I would NEVER be using it for actual riding around the city, I have a real bike for that, but I m mostly concerned about it being able to handle my weight since it is a kids bike. I also wanna buy another kids bike and steal the rims off of it to replace the ones on my bike and I wanna know if that ll be an issue as well. Help :(

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  • 5 months ago

    You should go to for Schwinn fitness bikes instead!

    They are cool and compact in design. You will experience reliable riding!

  • 5 months ago

    Yes you can fit on one

  • David
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Good bicycles are described using (at least) TWO measurements, FRAME size and WHEEL size.

    And just like jeans don t have a set ratio between waist size and leg length, bicycles don t have a set ratio between frame size and wheel size.

    Now, in the world of cheap bikes, as in most kids bikes and department store bikes, this is too complicated for them to mess with. So they simplify and use wheel size.

    Now, you ask "can I fit", then you give your weight.

    How did you expect THAT to work out?

    You might as well have asked what shoe size might suit you.

    Height would have been a far better number to give.

    So, assuming you re NOT a kid, and you want to use a kids bike - no, you WON T fit.

    You ll have your knees up to your chest if you try to do seated riding unless you do some SERIOUS mods to the frame.

    Breaking - I wouldn t worry about that. The way to make cheap bikes is to use thick pipes. And to stick with standard hub sizes. Unless you ride down stairs, it ll most likely hold. I built a kinda-sorta folder out of a 12" wheel size kids bike, and it has held up well.

    Rims are the metal hoops that the tire sits on. Replacing rims would mean rebuilding the wheels. Spoke count and ERD(Effective Rim Diameter) has to match for that to work. Unless you want to replace all spokes too.

    So I m guessing you mean replacing the WHEELS. That is certainly easier, but there are some numbers that needs to match here too. Axle type/length, wheel diameter. And you can t go crazy on the rim width either, if you want to reuse the tires.

    • (Cont.) This bike is by no means for serious riding, so I don't mind the discomfort. It looks like a little lowrider motorcycle type thing and I thought it would be cool to work on. You answered all my questions. Thanks :)

  • 5 months ago

    As with anything else, there's cheap sh*t and good stuff, 20" rims and wheels make no exception. This is a common rim size for compact bikes, folding bikes, recumbent bikes and some cargo bikes. If they're built well, 20" wheels will be stronger than larger wheels. I find that for me, the tire load capacity is usually the bigger issue.

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  • 5 months ago

    First, on a bicycle, rims are a component of the wheels, they are not the same thing. There is no way to know if the "rims" from one bike will fit another bike. The issue here is that you don't know the difference between a wheel and a rim

    In any case, the wheel size of a bicycle has little to do with whether the frame is designed for a rider of a certain height, which unfortunately you didn't happen to mention. Someone of your weight could possibly be as much as 6 feet tall, or maybe as short as 5 feet tall, no way to know.

    "I m planning on making it a low rider " How do you plan on doing this? That will involve frame modifications. How are your welding skills? Do you know how the modifications will impact on how the bike will ride?

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Since when did Vikings ride bikes as a tradition?

  • 5 months ago

    I just don’t know

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