My son's car was a total loss, what can he say for a better offer?

My son got a deal on his car, because he knew a friend. He paid 1650 for the car he has, but the car is normally sold at lowest about $2500. He was given an estimate for his car, but its not enough to purchase the same car or another one in the area we live in. How can he negotiate for a better offer?

14 Answers

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  • 5 months ago

    Insurance will give him fair market value for the car before the accident. That is the end of it.

  • Jay P
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Did your son fix anything or purchase anything on the vehicle while he owned it? You can use those receipts to say there was additional money put into this vehicle recently which would increase its value.

    I had a co-worker that had a vehicle that was written off. He had just replaced the transmission a few months earlier so he submitted those receipts to his insurance company and it increased the value of the vehicle significantly.

  • 5 months ago

    If you can find and print out ads, pictures, prices for the same or similar cars, same age, similar mileage, similar condition -- and higher prices -- in your area and present them to the insurance company, you *might* have a chance of getting a better offer. Using Kelley Blue Book and other online pricing sources does no good because the insurance company can easily argue that the prices are not representative of prices in your area. Only actual ads or sale prices from your area are going to have a chance for you. And get a handful of those ads, not just one or two.

  • 5 months ago

    Go to Kelley Blue Book, www.kbb.com. Input all of the info on your vehicle. Get a retail price. Add sales tax and title transfer charges. The site will also find similar cars available for sale.

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  • 5 months ago

    If he can find similar examples of his car for sale at a higher price than he's offered he may be able to reject the offer once. But no more than once.

  • Eva
    Lv 4
    5 months ago

    Pictures to show it's condition before the accident, research it's value on resale sites, Edmunds, or Kelly Blue Book. Remember that his deductible will come off whatever value they determine, so he's not going to get the full value anyway.

  • Kaz
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    He can't get any more than what the insurance company thinks is fair market value is for a car in fair condition. It really doesn't matter what he paid for it, if he paid $ 5K for it, and its FMV is $2500, he'll only get the FMV. You could argue with the insurance company that maybe it was in great condition, or had some valuable add on (special equipment) or very low mileage - they'll "might" adjust the payment a few hundred dollars.

  • 5 months ago

    When you apply for insurance, they ask you what you paid for the car. If he got a great deal, that is the maximum they will go.......unless you can argue that the car appreciated in value.

    They have the money and he is walking. Not an even bargaining table.

    • Robsteriark
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Insurers will not cover appreciation in car value unless the customer pays more for an “agreed valuation” policy. Most car insurers do not offer that option. But even with that in place they will not pay more than the last agreed value.

  • .
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Back in 2008, I was rear-ended about 300 miles from my home causing 9,200 dollars damage to my Nissan Titan. The insurance company said they would pay for a rental while my truck was getting fixed, but it had to be a subcompact. Once I mentioned getting a lawyer, they quickly said I could get a full-size pickup.

    Lawyers sometimes can fix problems.

    • TheReal
      Lv 5
      5 months agoReport

      There's no legal reason you would need a lawyer. At best, you make a few hundred more by trying to negotiate with an insurance company. It would cost more than that for a consult and retainer fee.

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    He has to find examples of similar cars for sale. The closer these cars are to his vehicle the more likely his insurer will cave in. They always start low as it's a business matter. He will have to put the research in to get the offer raised.

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