Kuroko asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 7 months ago

A question about English grammar?

I'm studying English.

I have a question about English.

What's the difference between the following sentences? In what situations do you use each?

1. It impressed me that she remembered my name.

2. I was impressed that she remembered my name.

Thanks in advance.

9 Answers

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  • 7 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    I'm afraid some answers have been wholly wrong.

    The sentences are both correct, they are both in Past tense, and there is no significant difference in meaning.

    Let me clear up this nonsense about Passive and Active. Note that 'Passive' does NOT mean 'I feel emotionally disconnected'. It is a strict grammatical structure, like this:

    Active: My cat ATE a bird. Past simple.

    Passive: A bird WAS EATEN by my cat. Past simple.

    Active: It IMPRESSED me that ... Past simple.

    Passive: I WAS IMPRESSED ... Past simple.

    Many people are the victim of an old myth that using the Passive voice is somehow wrong or ineffective. Yes, sometimes it is, but sometimes it isn't. It is always up to the writer to decide.

    My personal choice would be 'I was impressed that she remembered my name', as the other sentence strikes me as rather formal.

    But I repeat, this can only be a personal choice. Both sentences are perfectly correct, and there is NO significant difference in meaning.

    • Kuroko7 months agoReport

      Thank you very much for your detailed answer!!

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  • 7 months ago

    They both mean essentially the same thing. So far as idiomatic English, it's probably more common to use the first if you're telling someone about being impressed, and the second if you're writing about it or some other more formal medium.

    formeng

    • John P
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      No.2 feels a little less "personal" than No.1, but both forms might be used by native speakers of British English.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    There’s hardly a difference and they are both correct.

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  • Anonymous
    7 months ago

    Each is defined as for every one.

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  • 7 months ago

    They are both correct. However, we learn in creative writing that the active verb "impressed" is preferable to passive "was" when there is a choice. So option 1 is preferable, but option 2 is not incorrect.

  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    7 months ago

    both sentences sound good

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  • 7 months ago

    1) That is in the present tense.

    2) That's past tense

    So 1 would be writting in a current situation while the other would be something you talk about that happened to you some time ago. That may be a few hours ago or a lifetime ago.

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Sorry, Eva, but how can you not see that these are both simple past tense sentences? You could use either of them in your scenario.

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  • 7 months ago

    They mean the same thing. The only difference is in the structure.

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    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      7 months agoReport

      Eva, you are very mistaken. It makes no difference whether the woman was present or not; the fact is that what she did (remembering your name) IMPRESSED you; you WERE impressed. Both those structures are plain and simple Past tense.

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  • 7 months ago

    There is no difference at all.

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