Who are the descendants of the people who owned Israel BEFORE the ancient Hebrews moved in?

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  • 3 months ago

    No One knows as they are ALL DEAD... REMEMBER YOUR BIBLE... Everyone except for Noah and his kids were drowned by your great and loving god and the world was repopulated from NOAH... A JEW...

  • John E
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    The actual inhabitants of Palestine were the Palestinians.

    These people were and still are, a Mediterranean nation and they have been there for at least two millennia before the arrival of the interestingly featured Jews.

    Our Jewish friends are a nomadic tribal group, called the "Travelers" and are spread out almost on the entire planet.

    To be honest they have no business on the Holy Land, especially after their immediate involvement to the death of Jesus Christ my friend.

    Hope I was able to be of help.

    Thank you for sharing,

    Greetings

    • John P
      Lv 7
      4 months agoReport

      First you have to understand that the present borders of Israel were fixed only in 1948, then enlarged by war later. No part of the Middle East was really a "country" before anybody, let alone Hebrews, moved in many thousands of years ago.

  • 5 months ago

    Israel made after paganism was destroyed. The tribes exist in Torah..

    • Robert
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Map Jewish Kingdom of Israel - United, incl. West Bank, Gaza, and Golan Heights, capital of (what is now EAST) Jerusalem / “Old City”,
      between 1050 BCE / 1723 BH and 930 BCE / 1599 BH:
      http://www.crcnh.org/downloads/biblical-maps/american-bible-society/04-United-Israelite-Kingdom.jpg

  • Jerome
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    The canaanites.

    Jews originated as an ethnic and religious group in the Middle East during the second millennium BCE,[9] in the part of the Levant known as the Land of Israel.[22] The Merneptah Stele appears to confirm the existence of a people of Israel somewhere in Canaan as far back as the 13th century BCE (Late Bronze Age).[23][24] The Israelites, as an outgrowth of the Canaanite population,[25] consolidated their hold with the emergence of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah. Some consider that these Canaanite sedentary Israelites melded with incoming nomadic groups known as 'Hebrews'.

    The text is largely an account of Merneptah's victory over the Libyans, but the last 3 of the 28 lines deal with a separate campaign in Canaan, then part of Egypt's imperial possessions. The stele is sometimes referred to as the "Israel Stela" because a majority of scholars translate a set of hieroglyphs in line 27 as "Israel." Alternative translations have been advanced but are not widely accepted.

    • Robert
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Jerome - the Yahoo Answers System normally "locks" a comments area when the number of comments reach this sort of number. When this happens one saves comments but when the webpage is reloaded, the new ones are gone! If so, to continue, I suggest posting comments under Ludwig's answer !

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  • Ludwig
    Lv 6
    5 months ago

    Similar tribes. The Hebrews were a Canaanite tribe, just like the others.

    • Robert
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Contributor Jerome somehow (perhaps due to prejudice) seems to reject internationally-accepted history regarding the existence of the Jewish Hasmonean Kingdom of Judah.

  • 5 months ago

    The Hebrews displaced other ethnically-related tribal groups who have been described under the region-derived term "Canaanites". There is debate about the actual origin of the Hebrew people. Scientific evidence suggests that the Hebrew mythology about their origins is likely not very true and that the Hebrews themselves are also essentially Canaanites.

    I would offer the analogy of Mohawks versus Iroquois, if Mohawks had never joined the Iroquois Confederation and ended up displacing those other Iroquois instead, and tried to pretend that they were given the Iroquois lands by god, so all those other Iroquois were interlopers that needed to be driven out.

    The idea being that Hebrews did not truly migrate in and drive others out so much as simply come to dominate the region with passage of time and pretend that they were the rightful owners of the lands once shared.

    • Robert
      Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      The “Children of Israel” (previously “Hebrews”), became known as “Israelites” once they had entered Canaan and substantially defeated the then Canaanite nations, as instructed to do so by God.

  • 5 months ago

    Most likely, Egyptians owned Israel before their slaves (led by Moses) escaped and captured the lands.

    According to the old testament (Jewish bible), before Jews moved into Israel, they were "ordered by God" to defeat the residents, the Canaanites (archaelogical evidence shows that they consisted of diverse ethic groups based on the variety of burial customs). On a statue of King Idrimi, it says that Canaan consisted of several lands (Halab, Nihi (maybe drink sodas), Amae, and Mukish)). Amarna is part of Canaan, and was founded by Egyptian pharaoh Akhenaten (1350 BC), and Egypt had considerable power in Canaan. At this time, Egypt had enslaved Jews (and Moses escaped and took the Egyptian area of Canaan), an area where the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizze. Hivites, and Jebusits (according to Exodus 3:7).

  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Really really ancient Hebrews.

  • 5 months ago

    Canaanites. But the Hebrews didn't "move in", they were Canaanites too. The Exodus and subsequent conquests of Joshua are just Biblical tales. The historical reality is that pre-Israel Canaan had various northwest Semitic groups living there. Some as city dwellers, some as hill-tribesmen, and some desert nomads. After the chaotic end of the Bronze Age a group of these hill-tribesmen who were the Hebrews took advantage of the situation, came down and seized the old Canaanite cities for themselves.

    The modern descendants of the Canaanites would be quite hard to trace since the region has had foreign peoples coming in, and native people being exiled out, for millennia. But a true native of the region today could identify as Palestinian or just as easily Israeli. Because they're really just divergent cultures of the same people.

    • Greg Toolson
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      @Parousia- Perhaps you should be the one researching. Start with Dever. His first name doesn’t come to mind right now, but was a leading archaeologist in Syro-Palestine.

  • Athena
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Depends on when you are talking about and where. That area has been going back and forth between tribes for thousands of years.

    • bluebellbkk
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Agreeing with @John P. These events were so long ago that there is no sense in arguing any kind of ownership.

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