Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Business & FinanceCareers & EmploymentTechnology · 5 months ago

It getting any type of IT or Computer Science degree a terrible career choice?

I will use a Dilbert comic strip I saw once to sum it up. Dilbert goes into his employers office and they have the following conversation:

Dilbert: "I need this class to update my skills. Will you approve the expense?"

Employer: "Where's the analyses of alternatives?"

Dilbert: "What do you mean?"

Employer: "The analyses of alternatives. When you ask me for funding, you have to tell me what my options are."

Dilbert: "Oh okay, well option 2: Do nothing while I become increasingly unqualified at my job.

Option 3: Replace me with someone younger who you can pay less money to and who already has the skills.....oh rats."

Does that about sum up the IT field in a way that doesnt apply to a lot of other fields?

Afterall, you can pay for your own continuing education, keep up with all the latest skills, but once you're middle aged you'll be commanding a higher salary that your company doesnt have to pay.

Because every summer, there will be a fresh new supply of 22 year old college graduates who have all the latest tech skills who can be hired at half the salary of a middle aged employee with 20 years on the job, and they'll be thrilled to take the offer.

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    Join the French Foreign Legion.

  • John
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    I worked with, supported and trained others in computers for 40 years and never had any formal training, I just liked working with computers.

  • Judy
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    no, a new grad, even if they know the latest tech skills, is not able to do anywhere near as good a job as someone with years of experience

  • 5 months ago

    Because every summer, there will be a fresh new supply of 22 year old college graduates who have all the latest tech skills who can be hired at half the salary of a middle aged employee with 20 years on the job, and they'll be thrilled to take the offer.

    They don't have the experience. And it will take them years to gain it. New graduates aren't totally worthless, but they're close.

    If you want to learn a new skill, go to Barnes & Nobel & buy a tek book on it. You don't have to go to a class.

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  • 5 months ago

    These problems are not unique to It or Computer Science but they are also not as commonplace as you seem to think. You are WAY over-analyzing this problem and possibly using it as an excuse to do nothing to get along with your career. Sometimes you have the TRY different things to find out how they actually work rather than trying to figure it all out in your mind.

  • 5 months ago

    i dont think so, i think its a good career choice

  • 5 months ago

    If an employer does not invest in their employees, that would generally be a company-wide issue, not solely the IT function.

    If you are concerned about not learning new skills or keeping abreast of new technology, discuss the companies employee development process during the interview process.

    To be honest, if you become an expert in a specific technology that is being phrased out, that can make you very valuable. How much do you think Costco pays for their RPG programmers? At least 3x what they are paying a general web designer.

    • A Hunch
      Lv 7
      5 months agoReport

      Even when it's gone, there is times that people need to find XYZ and the old school guys are the ones they call in. A young guy who knows RGP is probably earning $200 an hour. Cobal is becoming the same.

  • 5 months ago

    I worked in Silicon Valley almost my whole career. EVERY company in Silicon Valley will gladly pay for you to go to night school and improve your job skills. I went to night school (community college) on and off throughout my career, and I was really just a technician (though for a while I had the title of 'engineer'). The big companies would much rather send an engineer to school than hire a newbie with training but no experience. (Though when these companies expand, there's plenty of room for newbies!)

    Having to go to school to keep up is a problem, though. A really good engineer, by the time he's 45 or so, wants off the merry-go-round. So the best ones transition into management, which doesn't require you to be right on top of the engineering world.

    A decent IT or Computer Science guy will always have a job. In the 80s, computer programmers were so scarce that my employers let ME do it. 8^)

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