My timing belt broke, what now?

The timing belt I replaced less than 6K miles ago just broke. The dealership said I would have to replace the motor, so their suggestion would be to take the vehicle back to the volvo specialist that replaced the timing belt as clearly an error was made.

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Did you do the work? Then you only have the purchase receipt which should have the mileage the belt was replaced at and the date written down and you might have some financial help from the belt maker.

    . If you have none of that then you are SOL.

    If a mechanic or dealership did the work then they would have a record of when the change took place (as they would be seeking compensation from the belt maker too). There "MIGHT BE' THAT route to go.

    . You can only ask and find out what is up. It is not a lot of money, but it is some.

    Usually when the belt breaks the piston and the valves make contact and only the valves get damaged. So, a head job (or top end) gets done. and the puppy is slapped back together with a new belt and ALL IS GOOD. When the mechanics take off the head they can see what is damaged (sometimes a piston gets a hole in it...most times not) so bottom end is left alone.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Did you do your own work? A serpentine belt has to go on a certain way & with propertention. The valves must be properly aligned. You now need a new valve head & maybe new pistons. That's your fault.

  • zipper
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    Talk to an attorney, the dealer gave you some sound advice, his work should have some short of warranty on it.

  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    If the valves have hit the pistons you've trashed the engine, but the head must be removed to determine this.

    However, if the engine turns over you could try another belt and see what happens.

    • Lv 4
      6 months agoReport

      also, its possible only fixable damage to engine, & if so, maybe could study about it & very Carefully & Correctly do it on own, then would be sure its done correctly, can get excellent OEM replacement parts & adequate equipment to do it on own for Much less than another engine, which could also :(

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Did you get any sort of warranty from the shop who replaced it? If so, and it broke within the warranty period, then you may be able to take them to court if they refuse to repair your car. If you got no warranty, you still may be able to sue them assuming that you have proof they did the work - or didn't actually do it as the case may be. You may even be able to sue the part manufacturer if it can be proved the belt was properly installed. It's VERY hard to break a new belt. In any case, you'll probably need a lawyer.

  • Dan
    Lv 4
    6 months ago

    Take it back to the shop, they can decide if they want to pull the head or the motor.

  • 6 months ago

    'What now' is that you do what the dealership told you to do.

    As 'thebax2006' said, there should be a warranty on both the belt, and their work - and if the belt broke and damaged the engine, then they will need to fix or replace the engine.

    If they say anything other than 'yessir', then come back with some violent friends and 'convince' them to honor the warranty.

    • Lv 5
      6 months agoReport

      Force them to eat Lutefisk...

  • 6 months ago

    I would pee on it

  • 6 months ago

    The timing belt job should have a 12 month, 12,000 mile warranty on the work.

    They should have to replace the valves or the motor since they obviously messed up.

    Call them and get the vehicle towed to their shop.

    Source(s): Mitsubishi Master Tech
  • 6 months ago

    Take it back yes.

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