what likely happened to the native people of old Lambeth London?

the native English folk of lambeth in the 50's 60's and earlier? as immigration grew and grew until there are no native english people from lambeth in lambeth now...what happened to the original people of lambeth?

i am a native british man. i hope someone can help with this query, no nonsense.

8 Answers

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    6 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    So based on your own "i am a native british man" meaning you were born/brought up in the UK............ same goes for ANYONE of ANY shade of skin born/brought up in Lambeth are native, they either remain in Lambeth or move to another area, same as anyone else does

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    • Lv 6
      6 months agoReport

      A Muslim will never be British all the Time they practise the islamic cult

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  • Zapata
    Lv 6
    6 months ago

    Pish. You are NOT a native, you are a fraud. No Londoner would ever refer to it as "old Lambeth London".

    • ?5 months agoReport

      If you suspect fraud you should tell the police

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    The Muslims will drive them out in their bid to Muslimise the UK

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    • Lv 6
      5 months agoReport

      Zapata · i only tell the truth and after living in 7 muslim countries i Know islam is a bigger threat than Global warming

      Islam is a cult hell bent on destroying planet earth

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  • 6 months ago

    They all went to jails and geriatric hospitals.

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  • Anonymous
    6 months ago

    Most of my family come from Kennington and Borough (so Lambeth and Southwark). Although on my mum’s side they were born to an Italian dad (he came here at the start of WW1 to fight for the British) who married a Cornish woman.

    Some remained in the area and had families with locals and with newcomers. Ironically it’s the “immigrant” side of my family which couldn’t accept the new immigrants and so most of those moved out to places like Rochester, Gillingham and Canterbury (all in Kent) or to places in and around Crawley (in Sussex).

    So basically my family is typical. Some didn’t like living amongst newcomers, who often outnumbered them, and others accepted and embraced it.

    I still live in Croydon, and here we’re seeing plenty of Carribean families moving from inner London to get away from the African immigrants. It’s not necessarily racism, but is more whether people are xenophobic or xenophilic.

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    6 months ago

    They moved somewhere else. Simple as that. As Brian said, "white flight".

    I'm sure they haven't ALL done that. Not everyone can afford to. But if you're going to invite immigrants from the non-white Commonwealth to help rebuild after WWII (and that's what was done - Windrush and all that), inevitably you're going to get areas that don't look full of white people any more. "Birds of a feather flock together" - it has to be admitted that people feel happier with other people most like themselves, same culture, somewhere they can get their kind of food... I know it is unpopular with "politically correct" people to say this but I say to them, look around you, you can SEE it.

    I'm deliberately referring to skin colour because by now most of the non-white immigrants ARE English with British citizenship, and they've had children and grandchildren who were born British. White does not equal English, not any more.

    You could ask the same about my own native London suburb of Southall, which now looks like "Little India" and has been called that! It was a running joke in the sixth form that I was the ethnic minority as I was the only white person doing science A levels. My parents always had a plan to retire further out to be closer to friends from work, Dad unfortunately died at 58 before they could do it, but Mum did it and of course I had to go too as I couldn't afford my own place to live (and nor could my sister). And that's where I am now.

    (Not with Mum - I did eventually save up enough to buy my own flat, and now she's on her own she's moved into a retirement village a little further out, not even in Greater London any more, where she's having a whale of a time being with lots of other people her own age. The big downside, as she says, is lots of funerals as everybody's old so she knows the local crematorium rather well!)

    That's it, really - people move house.

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  • 6 months ago

    Many of their descendants are still living there; many people alive in the 50s and 60s have of course died; some moved to other areas. No mystery

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  • Brian
    Lv 5
    6 months ago

    The first answer had it about right i would say, neighbouring counties like Essex,Kent and Surrey are probably home to a number of the descendents of the Whites of mid 20th century inner London Borough's, isn't there a term called White flight, where the native White population have headed further and further out into the suburbs and sourounding countryside during times of mass immigration resulting in traditionally White areas becoming majority African or Asian in population.

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